New York on Film in the 1970s

Posted on: November 18th, 2009 at 6:18 am by

Later tonight, the 92Y Tribeca is hosting a free screening of four 16 mm film prints from the New York Public Library.  Each of the short films – Bowery Men’s Shelter, Crosby Street, Huberts, Coney Island – captures the essence of New York City during the 1970s.  The event kicks off at 6:30 pm in the 92YTribeca Screening Room, 200 Hudson Street.

nyc1970[Photo via 92YOnline]

Bowery Men’s Shelter (10 min)
Bowery Men’s Shelter is the portrait of the many alcoholics, drug addicts and ex-mental patients at a men’s shelter on East 3rd St in the early ’70s.
Directors: Tony Ganz and Rhody Streeter. 1972.

Crosby Street (18 min)
Crosby Street is a short that reveals the various social and economic degrees on the streets of New York City. The film includes interviews with the various residents, merchants and homeless.
Director: Jody Saslow. 1975.

Huberts (7 min)
A nostalgic look at Hubert’s Flea Circus and Museum on West 42nd St in the early ’70s, Huberts shows us a world on the brink of extinction.
Directors: Vicki Polon, Rhody Streeter and Tony Ganz. 1972.

Coney Island (8 min)
“Made by two teen filmmakers in the early 1970s, Coney Island is an ode to Coney Island’s appeal and history as an urban summer refuge begins onboard a crowded F subway train. The fishing pier, the beach and Astroland arcade and amusement park rides, including the famous Cyclone rollercoaster, are explored to the accompaniment of a lively jazz soundtrack, sounds of summer and insights from locals and lovers of Coney Island. Historical photographs are used to illustrate remembrances of Coney Island’s exuberant past.”—NYPL
Directors: Steve Siegel and Phil Buehler. 1973.

New York on Film in the 1970s, 92YTribeca, 200 Hudson Street


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  • Anonymous

    I was in Hubert’s Museum in the early 60s and saw a bearded lady, sword swallower, and a disgusting flea circus that gave me the creeps. When I got back to downtown and showed the magic tricks I picked up the big boys took them away from me and said, “Get outta here, kid!” I hated them…and still do.

    • http://www.boweryboogie.com Elie

      Thanks for sharing! What were the magic tricks that got confiscated?

      • Anonymous

        They weren’t real magic tricks, one was of a paper hula dancer which you held up to a flame of a match and if you swayed it back and forth you created an illusion of her dancing. I though it was neat, until one of the big guys said “Lemme try,” and with a smirk on his face held the dancer too close to the burning flame…It wasn’t fair, I thought, as I watched my memories of Huber’s disappear into nothingness…

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  • http://thegoglog.blogspot.com/ Goggla

    These films were great – thanks for the blurb, BB.