Hotel Ludlow Packs Up Scaffolding

Posted on: October 1st, 2010 at 6:33 am by

Fresh off speculative news that boutique hotelier BD Hotels is purchasing the stalled eyesore that is Hotel Ludlow, a large section of the longstanding scaffolding has been packed up and carted away.  Just a little bit of freedom in an otherwise arrested development. Nevertheless, we predict another couple years of delays.  At least.

If the juicy scoop is to be believed, and BD Hotels does in fact purchase the vacant site, then upper Ludlow is in for even more of a shitshow.  Think something along the lines of Maritime, Chambers, Greenwich, Jane or Bowery hotels – these are other properties in their portfolio.  As if this strip of the Lower East Side wasn’t already ruined beyond repair.

Yet these latest developments spell but another unfortunate chapter in the saga of this beleaguered property. Once upon a time, a century-old, modest commercial supply business operated here.  From 1898 to 2007, Joseph Yavarkovsky Paper supplied delis and restaurants with paper goods.  After such a long life, that storied history had a shotgun marriage with the wrecking ball, and soon gave birth to baby Hotel Ludlow.

[Hotel Ludlow in Infancy, April 2008]

The Hotel Ludlow drank plenty of milk and ate its Flintstones vitamins, eventually reaching a height of nineteen stories by September 2008.  There were high hopes for the kid, 170 guest rooms and an “exclusive roof deck,” to be completed in 2009.  Thanks to the economic meltdown, though, young HL fell on proverbial hard times and never recovered.  It has since been decomposing before our very eyes.  However, there was renewed interest in the property last October, when big daddy developer Serge Hoyda extended a hand to try and transform the problem child into an affordable rentals complex.  Yeah, that never happened either.

How do you think the situation with 180 Ludlow should be solved? Hit us up in the comments!

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