Low Line Park Proposed for Trolley Station Beneath Delancey Street

Posted on: September 18th, 2011 at 10:52 am by

The Lower East Side has already poached galleries from Chelsea, and now it wants some of that High Line cache, albeit with a twist.  Indeed, there’s a new idea being floated in architecture circles of a subterranean “Low Line” park beneath the Delancey thoroughfare.  That’s right, under the pavement.  One to compete with that west side bastion of tourism.

Underneath Delancey is reportedly a vast two-acre trolley terminal which once housed the cars for crossing the Williamsburg Bridge. But it’s been fallow for the last sixty years (calling Steve Duncan!).  If architect James Ramsey and his team at RAAD have their way, this ambitious new project aims to be a beacon of light where there is none.  According to Inhabitat:

The park will be equipped with extensive lighting units utilizing fiber optics to channel natural daylight to the depths below. Dozens of lamppost-like solar collectors will be placed on the Delancey Street to complete this task. And as a bonus, the system the designers envision will also filter out harmful ultraviolet and infrared light, but keeping the wavelengths used in photosynthesis to foster and nourish plant growth.

None of this will happen until, at the very least, the design team achieves approval from Community Board 3.  That hearing will transpire this Wednesday with the Land Use Zoning committee.

Seems like a hokey idea.  What do you think?

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  • Maqes2000

    Great Idea!

  • Maqes2000

    Great Idea!

  • David

    C.H.U.D.

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • not going to happen. mta property.  also look what happened to the high line.  i subscribed to their mailing list when they first presented their ideas to the public i thought it was going to be great, then I realized early on that these fuckers were going to be elitist snobs.  i unsubscribed.  i was right. 

  • East Villager

    I love the idea. Why “hokey”? It’s a beautiful repurposing of existing space, just sadly rotting away, into a relaxing pedestrian area. The only “hokey” risk is that it becomes saturated with retail and becomes an underground shopping mall. As a park, I love it.

    – East Villager

  • East Villager

    I love the idea. Why “hokey”? It’s a beautiful repurposing of existing space, just sadly rotting away, into a relaxing pedestrian area. The only “hokey” risk is that it becomes saturated with retail and becomes an underground shopping mall. As a park, I love it.

    – East Villager

  • karl

    Aw bring back the trolleys. heck the station is already here.

  • karl

    Aw bring back the trolleys. heck the station is already here.

  • karl

    Aw bring back the trolleys. heck the station is already here.

  • karl

    Aw bring back the trolleys. heck the station is already here.

  • karl

    Aw bring back the trolleys. heck the station is already here.

  • Guest

    We need a connection to the new east side subway. Let’s use it for an actual purpose instead of wasting it on a park that no one can even get to.

  • Guest

    We need a connection to the new east side subway. Let’s use it for an actual purpose instead of wasting it on a park that no one can even get to.