Proposal for 25-Story Tower in Cooper Square Urban Renewal Area on Chrystie Street

Posted on: May 30th, 2012 at 6:47 am by

All this talk about SPURA…what about CSURA?

The Cooper Square Urban Renewal Area (“CSURA”) – the eleven blocks of real estate between Bowery/Second Avenue/Stanton/East Fourth Street – has certainly faded from public attention in recent years.  Or at least since the Avalon Bay motherships invaded both sides of East Houston Street back in 2005-2006. Much of the neighborhood attention remained focused on the undeveloped lots along Delancey.  Times change.

Credit: Google Maps

Last summer, 9 and 11-17 Second Avenue (Mars Bar!) received their own “renewal” treatment – razed and soon to be replaced by another glass structure housing predominantly market rate housing (construction just reached street level). But there is another undeveloped CSURA parcel along Chrystie Street that is now on deck for mega-development. Next week, the Community Board 3 zoning committee will meet to discuss the fate of 215 Chrystie, and whether to approve the construction of a 25-story, as-of-right mixed-use project. Yes, you read that right!

If developers get their way, the vacant 215 Chrystie Street, currently a parking lot-garden combo, might sprout the 195,000 square-foot tower in the coming years. Not really a “minor modification.” The zillion dollar question remains, though – how much of the housing will be earmarked as “affordable”?

BSA Application No. 299-82-BZ for minor modification of a previously approved BSA variance for the former Site 1B of the former Cooper Square Urban Renewal Plan.  Modification is to amend the site plan to allow development of an approximately 195,500 SF, 25-story, as-of-right mixed use building on a vacant mid-block portion of the site, located at 215 Chrystie Street between Stanton Street and Houston Street (Block 427, Lots 2 (part) and 200)

Robert Moses was tasked with renewal of the tract in 1959, but the community stopped him from destroying whole blocks with the purpose of building a Stuy-Town-like complex. The land here was instead developed piecemeal.

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  • Bowerygals

    Sara Roosevelt Park is a narrow strip of respite for an already overcrowded community with very little greenspace. This building would cast the park in shade with such a high tower.

    The density this would bring to the neighborhood is just not tenable.

    • Jack Rose

      Yet, it’s as-of-right.