The Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society [NSFW]

Posted on: June 5th, 2012 at 6:29 am by

Never was al fresco reading so sexy.

Credit: OCTPFAS

With Moira Johnston making international headlines last month for nonchalantly walking topless through Union Square, other vocal advocates of the grassroots movement are making themselves known. At issue is a little-known state law forged in 1992 that allows women to go sans shirt anywhere men are permitted to do the same.

Credit: OCTPFAS

We saw a Kickstarter campaign called “Topless New York” that aims to raise awareness of the twenty-year-old statute through gallery shows and pinup calendars. But what about the nascent “Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society.” Seriously. For the second year running, this bare-breasted book club is stripping down for outdoor reading events. Memorial Day was the 2012 inauguration:

The sun was shining, the mercury hit 90-plus, and half a dozen of us lit out for Central Park, to strip down to as little as the law allows and gorge ourselves on good books and good company. In the shade near Strawberry Fields, in the open sun of Sheep Meadow, we lounged and laughed and read, and even made a few converts — three young women a few yards away saw us and were bare-breasted themselves instants later. It’s a movement! A revolution! Or at least one hell of a nice way to spend a summer afternoon.

If you’re interested in joining, hit them up! The current reading list includes the following:

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1309903806 Chet Kresiak

    If topfree women are “safe” and perfectly legal for the general public, including children, why the “NSFW” warning?

    • http://www.richpasco.org/ Rich Pasco

      Chet, unfortunately some employers still fire employees who view pictures of topfree women on their computer screens at work–even though those very same women may be seen in public parks in New York. Actually, some employers prohibit using work computers for any non-work purposes, so just about any non-business web page should say NSFW.

  • Paul Rapoport

    The NSFW warning is presumptuous, patronizing, and absurd. You feed the very inequality and phobia that the subjects of this article are fighting against.

    You might also read the NY State legal link that you provide. There was no state law forged in 1992. Failure to understand what happened then also makes it more difficult for women to assert themselves in the way your article describes.

  • Paul Rapoport

    P. S. The Kickstarter campaign you mention does not say it will produce pinup calendars. That’s your misunderstanding at work once more.

    • Topless New York

      In fairness, Paul, I’m not sure there’s that much difference between a “pinup” calendar and a “wall” calendar, which is what I said I would be producing from my photography series – unless you take the word “pinup” to be a pejorative, which I suppose some people might. Then again at this point, my campaign is only 5% funded, so I don’t know if I’m going to be producing much of anything, so the semantics are somewhat moot. :-)

      • http://www.richpasco.org/ Rich Pasco

        Is any calendar pinned to the wall a “pinup” calendar? Or just one with pictures of attractive women?

  • http://www.richpasco.org/ Rich Pasco

    The legality of top-freedom for women in New York didn’t come from a “little-known state law forged in 1992″ or a “twenty-year-old statute” as stated above. In the USA, any activity is legal unless a law prohibits it. What happened in 1992 was, the NY Court of Appeals ruled unconstitutional any law which sets different dress codes for men and women. Courts don’t “forge” new laws, but they can invalidate old ones based on constitutional grounds. In this case, the 14th amendment which provides for equal protection under the law overrode a discriminatory dress code.