Apple Maps Endorses “LoDel” Neighborhood Moniker

Posted on: November 21st, 2012 at 6:28 am by

First it was Bing maps, and now Apple has already followed suit. This deplorable LoDel moniker is apparently gaining some serious traction as label for that area south of Delancey between Allen and Essex Streets. The Cupertino giant baked it into their controversial new maps application.

Must every nook of every neighborhood be carved for real estate gain? Wait, don’t answer that.

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  • estragon_nyc

    Clarification: neither Apple Maps nor Bing Maps have “endorsed” this loathsome nickname. Real estate weasels have submitted it to them, and there’s no official review process to accept or reject them. All these online maps require user-submitted corrections, Google included. If Google has the edge for accuracy, it’s mainly because it has so MANY users who are activist about fixing this stuff.

    Think of the online maps as being like Wikipedia: anyone can come along and edit an entry to say all kind of dumb crap, and any accuracy comes from others being there to fix mistakes or lies. Or think of someone throwing a pile of garbage on your street. Your street isn’t “endorsing” that trash, but when it happens someone still needs to go out and get rid of the trash. Exact same thing here.

  • ohnonononono

    Neighborhood names change. They always have and always will. Many neighborhood names that we don’t bat an eye at today were originally named that by housing developers, the estates of the wealthy people who once lived there, or other people making profits off the very neighborhoods they’re describing. People who have an interest in an area, often an economic interest, are influential in creating the language we use to describe those areas. Times Square was named after the New York Times! Its original name was Longacre Square.

    While I don’t particularly love the name LoDel, it’s descriptive. It’s convenient. If LoDel were replacing a historic name in currency that’d be one thing, but this is a part of the LES that didn’t have its own specific neighborhood name (that I know of). If you say LoDel I know what area of the LES you’re talking about. Isn’t it nice to have to have names to refer to places? And I don’t own property or work in real estate.

  • architrance

    Bob LobLaw

  • sdf

    It has always been and will always be BelDel

  • http://twitter.com/ThomasHynes Thomas Hynes

    The only appropriate names for this neighborhood are “The Lowest East Side” and/or “Easy Broadway.” Everyone knows that.