Apple Maps Endorses “LoDel” Neighborhood Moniker

Posted on: November 21st, 2012 at 6:28 am by

First it was Bing maps, and now Apple has already followed suit. This deplorable LoDel moniker is apparently gaining some serious traction as label for that area south of Delancey between Allen and Essex Streets. The Cupertino giant baked it into their controversial new maps application.

Must every nook of every neighborhood be carved for real estate gain? Wait, don’t answer that.

Recent Stories

Woman Shoved onto Subway Tracks at 2nd Avenue F Station Last Night

Police are currently chasing a suspect for pushing a female straphanger onto the tracks at the 2nd Avenue F subway station last night. According to published reports, the 49-year-old woman was shoved onto the tracks from the northbound platform. Luckily no oncoming trains approached the station at the time of the incident. Good Samaritans nearby […]

Cup & Saucer Signage Removed Ahead of Rumored Grand Street Reboot

For the first time in decades, the marquee at 89 Canal Street is without its Cup & Saucer branding. Two-thirds of the restaurant’s signage was removed earlier this week – the paneling from both the Canal and Eldridge Street exposures. The swinging Coca-Cola sign, meanwhile, remains in place for the time being. This loss was expected. […]

Report: Village Voice Nixes Weekly Print Edition After More than 60 Years

Say goodbye to those Village Voice newspaper boxes. After more than sixty years serving up news to downtown New York City, current ownership decided to terminate the print format of the alt-weekly newspaper. The publication will remain online only as it struggles with success and relevance. “For more than 60 years, The Village Voice brand […]

Shepard Fairey Stencils Debbie Harry Mural Across from Long-Gone CBGB

As first reported here yesterday, artist Shepard Fairey took to Bleecker Street yesterday to impart a new punk rock mural. The two-year-old Joey Ramone treatment – what some have called a subtle advertisement for Overthrow Boxing Gym – had been erased the day before in preparation for the next in line. The piece is a […]

Ludlow Thai Spot ‘Eat-pisode’ (Hi-Thai) Calls it Quits After a Decade

After a ten-year tenure, Eat-pisode on Ludlow Street (aka Hi-Thai) is out of commission. The “gem-sized Thai bistro” (their words) closed at the end of July without warning or announcement. Prospective diners are instead met with computer printouts advertising the business for sale, and space for lease. Which is strange, considering the owner’s sister (and […]

  • estragon_nyc

    Clarification: neither Apple Maps nor Bing Maps have “endorsed” this loathsome nickname. Real estate weasels have submitted it to them, and there’s no official review process to accept or reject them. All these online maps require user-submitted corrections, Google included. If Google has the edge for accuracy, it’s mainly because it has so MANY users who are activist about fixing this stuff.

    Think of the online maps as being like Wikipedia: anyone can come along and edit an entry to say all kind of dumb crap, and any accuracy comes from others being there to fix mistakes or lies. Or think of someone throwing a pile of garbage on your street. Your street isn’t “endorsing” that trash, but when it happens someone still needs to go out and get rid of the trash. Exact same thing here.

  • ohnonononono

    Neighborhood names change. They always have and always will. Many neighborhood names that we don’t bat an eye at today were originally named that by housing developers, the estates of the wealthy people who once lived there, or other people making profits off the very neighborhoods they’re describing. People who have an interest in an area, often an economic interest, are influential in creating the language we use to describe those areas. Times Square was named after the New York Times! Its original name was Longacre Square.

    While I don’t particularly love the name LoDel, it’s descriptive. It’s convenient. If LoDel were replacing a historic name in currency that’d be one thing, but this is a part of the LES that didn’t have its own specific neighborhood name (that I know of). If you say LoDel I know what area of the LES you’re talking about. Isn’t it nice to have to have names to refer to places? And I don’t own property or work in real estate.

  • architrance

    Bob LobLaw

  • sdf

    It has always been and will always be BelDel

  • The only appropriate names for this neighborhood are “The Lowest East Side” and/or “Easy Broadway.” Everyone knows that.