Excessive Volume at The DL Triggers Shazam Across Delancey!

Posted on: December 17th, 2012 at 11:18 am by

[Photo: Charlotte Steinway]

There’s no need to even enter the DL – the groaning, neon-emblazoned (and veritably ill-fated) dance club occupying 95 Delancey Street – to know it exists. Rather, if you’re within a seemingly five-block radius of the 10-month-old venue, you’re bound to actually hear its presence. And that’s been the case ever since July, when we first reported six registered noise complaints in just one weekend.

And as a resident who lives kitty-corner to the vodka soda-slinging megalith, I can verify that the bass-thumping beats have done anything but subside. In fact, this past Thursday night (or rather, Friday morning), I was awoken around 1:45 am by the familiar club sounds of my neighbor across the street (which mind, you, is also one of the widest and heavily-trafficked thoroughfares in Manhattan). But much to my surprise, I awoke to a song I actually liked and recognized, and found myself wondering who it was by. So without question, I pulled out my phone to Shazam it—through my closed window—and it worked.

Julio Bashmore! I was right. So while the blaring, palm-tree lined hell hole formerly known as Ludlow Manor might have decent taste in DJs, they certainly don’t have any discretion for noise control. Music loud enough to cross the street and penetrate the windows.

-Written by Charlotte Steinway

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  • Steven

    I can only imagine how loud it’s going to be on thursday for designer drugs

  • el
  • From the area

    You worried abt. the noise on Delancey Street? The cars coming and going to/from the bridge don’t bother you? The Lower East Side is not for you.

    • A

      Hah nice try, PR rep for the DL. Go eat a dick.

    • Detex

      there is a difference btw cars and loud music

    • http://shawnchittle.com/ Shawn Chittle

      Passing cars are white noise, a whooshing sound. It can actually be quite pleasant, like the urban version of a babbling brook. Loud, repetitive music especially the four-on-the-floor bass of today’s music can actually drive you crazy.

      http://www.alternet.org/story/113479/a_history_of_music_torture_in_the_war_on_terror