‘Bates Motel’ Neons Light Up Houston Street

Posted on: February 19th, 2013 at 6:18 am by

bates-motel-billboard

A&E sees the bet anted by Old Navy and raises it more…with some psycho signage above the boundary of SoHo.

Truck-bound cranes and workers in harnesses spent the better part of last week installing a fancy new neon billboard on East Houston. It’s a high-profile plug for the debut A&E series, Bates Motel, a Hitcock-inspired spinoff that focuses on the relationship between Norman Bates and his mother prior to the events in Psycho. With its simplicity and bright blue glow, the advert totally trumps the equally ubiquitous Old Navy installation just a catty-corner away.

Bates Motel airs on A&E, March 18 at 10 pm.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nkn5aEadrX4

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  • http://twitter.com/bstolemyremote bitchstolemyremote

    We’ve always wondered if these kinds of high-profile, limited audience promotions work. We won’t be visiting NY anytime soon (though obviously it gets a mention online, hence this comment).

    Is it worth the expense to target a specific geographical audience such as New Yorkers?

    Has anyone ever been convinced to watch something because of one of these (compared to, say, a more traditional movie poster billboard)?

    • http://www.boweryboogie.com/ Dave Gustav

      Very tough to tell if they work. In theory, the targeted audience of New Yorkers consists of taste makers who will spread the messaging on their own. When someone you know tells you about something, it comes with the built-in trust that you have for that person. So that would be an argument for investing in a campaign like this. Out of home advertising is always hard to measure ROI, so it’s a hard thing to prove either way.

    • Ike1

      I see ads for certain cable TV shows in NYC (and other ads) that I rarely see anywhere else. They’re not always just targeting the audience, they’re also targeting the media buyers and advertisers who are often based in NYC. In other words, sometimes it’s advertising for advertisers, in the hope that they will advertise during these shows.

  • D Corn

    It doesn’t get viewers to tune in per se….
    More, its supposed to generate a ‘good public relations’ stand for its creator.
    I’d think A&E has ‘overdone’ this one…but maybe they had to – to ding Ol’ Nave