Happy Ending Space at 302 Broome Street for Sale Again

Posted on: February 1st, 2013 at 6:00 am by

happy ending 302 broome

A happy ending is seeming ever more unlikely for the “hidden” duplex club at 302 Broome Street. Three years after the dual spaces first hit the chopping block, the condo owner is again trying to unload the 3,846 square-feet of real estate. And at a reduced price of $1.8 million for both the ground level and basement components. A package deal. The previous listing was for $2.5 million.

Massey Knakal broker babble on this go-round, however, is definitely more forthcoming regarding the fate of Happy Ending. The two units will be delivered vacant upon purchase. That’s a change from the “can be” language previously used. Apparently they’re on a month-to-month arrangement.

Two Lower East Side / Chinatown retail condominium units within the 6-story condominium building located at 302 Broome Street. The property is situated on the north side of Broome Street between Forsyth and Eldridge Streets. The offering includes two retail condominiums, one of which is on the ground floor and the other in the basement. Although the offering consists of two condominium units, there is currently one operator using the space as one single business.

The space will be delivered vacant at the time of the sale and any Use Group 6 is permitted. Furthermore, there are no condo plan restrictions, venting is possible if desired and there are condensing units on the roof. The ground floor consists of 1,890 gross square feet, 1 ADA bathroom, a 7 ½ and 5 ton HVAC unit and 12’ ceiling. The basement consists of 1,986 grosssquare feet, 4 bathrooms, a 7 ½ ton HVAC, is fully sprinklered with elevator access and has an 8’ ceiling.

The property is located just steps from some of the biggest names in the restaurant, art and fashion industry in addition to two blocks from the JZBD subway lines. Although there is one operator currently in place, the business requires two liquor licenses since there are two lots included. Currently, there is a bar occupying both floors, with no lease in force. There are separate liquor licenses for each floor. Occupancy of 74 per floor totaling 148 for the entire business. There is no cabaret license. Please call for more information. Tours strictly by appointment only.

Group 6 usage is the zoning designation for retail and service uses.

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  • JL

    Is it over for the drunkards and the urination?