‘Reed Space’ Calls it Quits After 15 Years on Orchard Street, but Seeks New Digs

Posted on: August 29th, 2016 at 5:00 am by

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Reed Space, one of the longest running tastemakers on the Lower East Side, is packing up the store for good after fifteen years on the block. Its last day at 151 Orchard Street is September 30, promising a nebulous “reset” in the near future. Leasing sign and announcement to fan faithful all but confirm the news.

The fifteen year old lifestyle boutique at 151 Orchard Street is on the run, apparently seeking a reinvented image. There are plans to reopen elsewhere in the coming months, but exact location is unknown. Given the tenor of the following printout, it seems unlikely that it’s the Lower East Side.

Friends of Reed Space,

It is with regret that we inform you that Reed Space will be closing its doors at this location on September 30, 2016. We will be reopening at a new location in the very near future.

Since December 2001, Reed Space has lived on this humble block in the Lower East Side. We opened Reed before the dust even finished settling from the 9/11 tragedy. Back then, the idea of a space like this was completely new, different, and unique.

In the 15 years since then, times have changed tremendously. Our subculture has blossomed into an industry titan. We were once the outcasts. Now we’re the poster children. We literally ‘started from the bottom’ and it has been an incredible journey!

But we now feel it’s time for a complete reset. In 2001, we redefined what retail meant. What curation meant. What community space meant. We now feel it is time to redefine once again.

Jeff Ng – also known as Jeff Staple – founded Reed Space in 2001. His eponymous design house Staple Design, entered the scene four years earlier, and was reportedly the the precursor and eventual creative force behind the retail shop. Their offices were at 84 Orchard Street until 2011.

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