Reader Report: DOT Fails to Recognize 2-Way Protected Bike Lane with Chrystie Street Markings

Posted on: October 5th, 2016 at 9:44 am by
chrystie-bike-marking

Photo: Dave “Paco” Abraham

It looks like the Department of Transportation might be confused about the incoming two-way protected bike lane on Chrystie Street. Blame probably rests on the bureacracy of two different projects happening in the same spot.

Brooklyn bicycle activist Dave “Paco” Abraham alerted us to the striping stenciled on the fresh pavement at Grand and Chrystie Streets. (Water main work just completed at this intersection.) The sketched arrows appear to indicate the status quo setup of an UNPROTECTED bike lane, which is not the protected two-way lane that DOT promised the community.

Was this just an oversight? Either way, it’ll probably spell delays.

As previously reported, the plan to reconfigure the Chrystie Street bike lane is two years in the making. Community Board 3 first backed the project in February 2015, but the DOT didn’t officially green light until this past spring. Here is a quick summation of what’s happening…

Photo: DOT

Photo: DOT

  • The two-way bike lane is relegated to the east side of Chrystie Street, protected by jersey barriers, flexible delineators, and parked cars. It eliminates the need for southbound cyclists to cross the street to link up with the path (current situation).
  • Pedestrians benefit from the plan with the addition of medians at Rivington, Stanton, and East Second Streets. The concrete island at Canal Street is also moving ten feet to the west.
  • The two-way bike lane allows for a seamless transition from Second Avenue to Chrystie Street. As it stands, southbound cyclists must cross over at Houston Street while heading southbound, only to cross back for Manhattan Bridge access.
  • Adding a second southbound left turn lane at Delancey Street (protected signal), but at the expense of ten parking spots on the west side. The plan also includes the elimination of left-turn traffic from northbound motorists onto Delancey from Chrystie.
  • There will reportedly be specific traffic signals for bikers at each intersection along Chrystie.

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