‘CW Pencil Enterprise’ Moves from its Forsyth Street Locale

Posted on: August 2nd, 2017 at 5:04 am by

In news that will surprise no one, CW Pencil Enterprise will not be reopening on Forsyth Street. It follows a similar trajectory as address-mates Birds & Bubbles and the Football Cafe, both of which succumbed to fallout from onsite renovations by newish owner Veracity Real Estate.

The ongoing interior remodeling of 100-102 Forsyth Street reportedly created a “serious safety issue with the building” earlier this month, which caused owner Caroline Weaver to close up temporarily. The short-term closure proved permanent, though – a stroll by the store shows that the space is completely empty. Furnishings and branding removed within the last couple weeks.

However, a revival is on the way. CW Pencil Enterprise announced last Tuesday that the specialty pencil store is actually moving to a new location in the neighborhood. A couple blocks away, in fact. Expect its arrival in September.

“We’re devastated that our time on Forsyth St. has come to an end but we have so many awesome things planned for our new shop, which will still be in our lovely neighborhood,” the store wrote in a Facebook post to followers.

Veracity purchased the pair of tenements at 100-102 Forsyth in January 2016 for a cool $16 million. Shortly thereafter, the conversion (and problems began). Now, the four ground-level commercial units are without tenancy.

Birds & Bubbles pulled the plug back in April due to alleged negligence over conditions that essentially destroyed the restaurant; they claimed that the contractors hired by Veracity caused at least six floods since the prior December, with water cascading out of light fixtures, damaging ceilings and floors, electronics, point-of-sale systems, and more. Ownership subsequently filed suit and seeks $1.3 million in damages.

The Football Cafe had likewise closed the same month due a dispute stemming from purported “building issues, hazardous conditions from construction, leaks, and power outages.” It reopened a month later, but now appears on the sidelines yet again. The sidecar gallery space was seized by the Marshal earlier this month, and the gates of the cafe are shuttered.

Last but not least, Deadly Dragon Sound faded almost immediately after Veracity purchased the building.

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