Prince Street, Prepare to ‘Dig Inn’ Next Week

Posted on: September 12th, 2017 at 5:05 am by

Chef Peter Hoffman, whose pair of trailblazing restaurants held court at 70 Prince Street for decades, has given way to a national chain. The health-conscious Dig Inn, which bills itself as a “farm-to-counter” concept, replaced Back Forty West (and Savoy before that). This SoHo iteration will be more upscale than the rest when it opens sometime next week.

As such, eight months of renovations are nearing conclusion. The one-story plywood box that wrapped the storefront since last January was recently peeled away for the big reveal. An employee inside confirmed that the two-level restaurant should open on September 20.

The redesign of 70 Prince Street is based on the layout at the Boston location, according to a summer 2016 report filed in Eater. In fact, the look and feel is reportedly identical. Expect limited table service in addition to the standard ordering counter, which will include servers refilling drinks and busing tables. Beer and wine is available at night and on weekends, and breakfast and weekend brunch will be offered.

Choice of address is certainly apt, too. Dig Inn culinary director Matt Weingarten once-upon-a-time worked at the Savoy.

And if you’re interested, below is the contents of the farewell note from Hoffman that was temporarily affixed to the facade pre-remodeling.

Peter and I have been so touched by all the people who have come by to share and tell us how much our restaurants have meant, the pleasures had sharing meals with friends and loved ones. That is exactly what we set out to do; create a beautiful space that was somewhat of a respite from living in NYC but still very much a part of it.

After 26 years, we move on.

Please do not think it was about “the landlord” and the vagaries of commercial rent in NYC. Our landlords have been fair with us. They are artists themselves. They bought this building in the 1970s when they each lived “above the store.”

Peter is going to write a book, take a sabbatical, and continue to be an activist in causes he has championed for decades.

70 Prince Street, March 2017

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