DHS Maintains it Has No Plans to Convert Delancey Holiday Inn into Homeless Shelter

Posted on: November 7th, 2017 at 9:49 am by

The Holiday Inn at 150 Delancey Street is currently housing a small number of homeless individuals, the city confirmed in response to our exclusive yesterday. More specifically, some rooms are earmarked as a temporary “emergency shelter.”

“We are currently using rooms in this commercial hotel to shelter homeless New Yorkers who would otherwise be turned out onto the street—and we have no plans to convert this location into ongoing shelter capacity,” Department of Homeless Services Deputy Press Secretary Arianna Fishman clarified. “Our use of this location is on a temporary basis to ensure our homeless neighbors are supported as they get back on their feet, not turned out into the streets, while we implement our plan to expand ongoing high-quality borough-based shelter capacity and finally end the use of ineffective stop-gap measures, like commercial hotels, that date back decades.”

Fishman also reiterated that the city has zero desire to convert 150 Delancey Street into a full-blown shelter. There are no proposals related to this location, she says, nor have they discussed transforming the property into an “ongoing shelter capacity.”

And regarding “emergency use of hotels” for housing, the official word…

In compliance with the right to shelter court order, the City places people in hotels under emergency situations when there is not enough shelter capacity on a given night. Until we are able to fully implement our plan and since the City is under court order to provide shelter under emergency circumstances at all times there will be some cases in which we need to provide emergency shelter and place families and individuals in hotels if we have reached capacity—and we notify communities regarding the use of these locations as early in advance of use as possible. Previously, the City did not provide notice regarding use of commercial hotels in emergency situations to meet immediate capacity needs, but we have updated our policies so we now provide notice to communities regarding emergency use of commercial as soon as we are able, and no later than the day we must utilize these locations to meet emergency needs. We are using commercial hotels as a bridge to provide emergency shelter to homeless New Yorkers, including families with children, who would otherwise be turned out into the street.

Needless to say, it appears that the community at large did not receive much notice about this emergency shelter situation, which has allegedly been ongoing the last few weeks.

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