New York on Film in the 1970s

Posted on: November 18th, 2009 at 6:18 am by

Later tonight, the 92Y Tribeca is hosting a free screening of four 16 mm film prints from the New York Public Library.  Each of the short films – Bowery Men’s Shelter, Crosby Street, Huberts, Coney Island – captures the essence of New York City during the 1970s.  The event kicks off at 6:30 pm in the 92YTribeca Screening Room, 200 Hudson Street.

This image has been archived or removed.

[Photo via 92YOnline]

Bowery Men’s Shelter (10 min)
Bowery Men’s Shelter is the portrait of the many alcoholics, drug addicts and ex-mental patients at a men’s shelter on East 3rd St in the early ’70s.
Directors: Tony Ganz and Rhody Streeter. 1972.

Crosby Street (18 min)
Crosby Street is a short that reveals the various social and economic degrees on the streets of New York City. The film includes interviews with the various residents, merchants and homeless.
Director: Jody Saslow. 1975.

Huberts (7 min)
A nostalgic look at Hubert’s Flea Circus and Museum on West 42nd St in the early ’70s, Huberts shows us a world on the brink of extinction.
Directors: Vicki Polon, Rhody Streeter and Tony Ganz. 1972.

Coney Island (8 min)
“Made by two teen filmmakers in the early 1970s, Coney Island is an ode to Coney Island’s appeal and history as an urban summer refuge begins onboard a crowded F subway train. The fishing pier, the beach and Astroland arcade and amusement park rides, including the famous Cyclone rollercoaster, are explored to the accompaniment of a lively jazz soundtrack, sounds of summer and insights from locals and lovers of Coney Island. Historical photographs are used to illustrate remembrances of Coney Island’s exuberant past.”—NYPL
Directors: Steve Siegel and Phil Buehler. 1973.

New York on Film in the 1970s, 92YTribeca, 200 Hudson Street


Recent Stories

Catholic Charities Hosting Pop-up Pantry in Alphabet City Today

This morning, Catholic Charities of New York, along with Tuscan Farms, is hosting another pop up food pantry – this time in Alphabet City. They plan on distributing 500 bags of food and 500 gallons of whole milk to support those struggling in the neighborhood. This is a part of their larger mission to assist […]

Fridays Under $40: Three Meals in Chinatown

On Monday, when The New York Times reported on Chinatown’s outdoor dining scene, it was the first time I was happy to be scooped. The more we talk about Chinatown, the better. I live on Mulberry, just north of Canal and I’ve noticed it’s been slow to reopen compared to neighboring Little Italy and Noho […]

Suffering the (Non-Masked) Night Crowds at Orchard and Broome

Hell Square hath multiplied. Come weekends, the block of Orchard and Broome is now its own crowded nightmare. This trend is years in the making, but reached critical mass this summer with the outdoor dining phenomenon as a result of coronavirus. Neighbors on the block are worried about these gatherings. Not so much the table […]

Hamilton Fish Pool Reopens for Shortened Summer Season

The Hamilton Fish Park Pool is finally open for the season. The outdoor amenity – known to locals as Pitt Pool – returned yesterday as part of the city’s second phase of borough pool openings. Its original date was actually August 1, but “piping” issues reportedly caused delays. “Due to an unanticipated failure of the […]

Chinatown Mural Project Brings ‘Noodles’ to Mosco Street

After tossing around the idea of a neighborhood street art program the last few years, I can finally say the Chinatown Mural Project is live. In the face of gentrification I had wanted for years to put up culturally appropriate murals around Chinatown depicting Chinese culture and the everyday life of Chinatown residents. (The “88 Gates” […]