New York Times Discovers Life Below Delancey

Posted on: May 8th, 2013 at 6:20 am by
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In case you might have thought otherwise, the Lower East Side south of Delancey is firmly in the crosshairs of gentrification. And now the so-called paper of record makes it official with a fairly derivative puff piece about this micro-neighborhood (some call it LoDel). Yes, the New York Times discovers that there’s actually life (and real estate deals) on the other side of the tracks.

Let’s see what they’ve uncovered, shall we?

Although new night-life attractions have begun pushing south down Ludlow Street from Delancey, they do not for the most part extend below Grand, leaving intact, at least for now, a certain low-key authenticity that many residents say they prize.

“The old world is still there,” said Glenn E. Schiller, a senior vice president of the Corcoran Group, even as art galleries and artisanal food shops pop up among old-school Jewish fabric and menswear stores.

Although uncharmed by the boxy modern architecture of Seward Park’s four brick high-rises, Ms. Peacock found its multigenerational mix appealing on her very first visit.

“There were young moms walking with babies, and young families,” she said, “but older people walking on the street, too, so it felt like a real neighborhood. And I was amazed at how quiet it was after living in the East Village.”

The neighborhood possesses an ethnic and socioeconomic mix that many residents say feels increasingly rare in Manhattan. A 2007-2011 census survey found some 60,332 people living in the 350-acre area bounded roughly by Delancey Street, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, the Bowery and Catherine Street. Fifty-three percent were Asian, the vast majority Chinese; 22 percent were white; 19 percent Hispanic, mostly Puerto Rican; and 4 percent were African-American. The median annual income was $30,550.

Of course, there’s no mention of the hotel in the works over at the Jarmulowsky Bank Building.

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