Where has the Lower East Side Gone?

Posted on: May 21st, 2013 at 6:20 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

The Village Voice is on the mind of many in the wake of the recent bloodletting up in Cooper Square. Michael Musto, Robert Sietsema, and Michael Feingold. And then the resignation of two other writers yesterday. All gone.

Thinking of the Voice, Boogie regular Esquared shared this gem from their archives – “Where Have All the Hipsters Gone.” First published on August 10, 1972, it’s interesting to note the parallels and see how far the neighborhood has come…

Perhaps a variation of the old Circle Theory is in play after all. When the coin-schleppers drove less fortunate artists and writers from the Village more than a decade ago they repaired to the Lower East Side — a veritable slum — but rents were more agreeable — some even fair. There are now buildings down here — renovated to be sure — which command $380 a month for three rooms. In a slum. Dig that. It is not inconceivable that the time is coming when wretched poor people won’t be able to live in this slum — when artists who Have Not Made It won’t be able to live here either. Then the apartments will go to the quasi-hip brokers and lawyers who want to vamp Where It’s Hapnin Baby (or was). These situations in New York City have been historically cyclical. Greenwich Village, for instance, was a black ghetto for some time after the Civil War — before Harlem. And Harlem. My mother lived in Harlem for a few years in the ’20s while she waited tables midtown. Today she wouldn’t go there in an armored car with the Mayor riding shotgun.

There are priorities and necessities which must be present (on all sides) in the emerging of any “artists’ colony” — and economics is certainly one of them. In the summer of 1963 I lived on the Lower East Side for more than three months on something less than $150 cash. Today it would take a grand. Minimum. From the speculators’ point-of-view it seems that the very presence of artists in abundance is sufficient: they follow close on their heels judiciously snapping up properties, naming them with hysterical designations such as the Hip Bagel and the Hippydrome and the Rock and Roller Skating Rink, and when they own everything they’ve killed their golden goose and then must begin following the next exodus to the new land of paint and money.

Read the full piece here.

Recent Stories

Levain Bakery to Open First Downtown Location on Lafayette Street Next Week

In a first, Levain Bakery is headed downtown. News that we first reported in March 2019. Now, more than a year after breaking the news, the sweets shops confirms that next Wednesday (February 26) is the opening date at 340 Lafayette Street (at Bleecker Street). Teaser signage in the window had promised this debut as […]

Hoy Wong Restaurant Fades After 42 Years on Mott Street

A Chinatown stalwart is now retired. The Hoy Wong restaurant at 81 Mott Street closed down last weekend. A handwritten sign on the front door explains that the lease was up, and ownership elected to retire instead of renew. The eatery spent 42 years in the neighborhood and a popular pit-stop for locals and tourists. […]

Scarr’s Pizza is Planning a Second Location at a Midtown Food Hall

Out of nowhere, news that Scarr’s Pizza is expanding to include a second city location this spring. Eater had the scoop yesterday, citing the website of the architecture firm Le Whit, which lists the pizzeria as client. The new location is similarly small – 250 square-feet, but “reiterating the restaurant’s current branding” with its “retro […]

Talkin’ ’bout My Generation: Memories of Bill Graham and the Fillmore East

While working on our story about the new “Bill Graham and The Rock & Roll Revolution” exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, this reporter started collecting personal stories and memories of Graham’s legendary music venue, the Fillmore East. Located on Second Avenue and East 6th Street, the building began life in 1926 as The Commodore, […]

Chatham Square Library Closed for ‘Building Repairs’ Until Next Month

The Chatham Square Library is currently down for maintenance. The so-called “building repairs and improvements” are scheduled to last through February 29, with the library itself to reopen the following Monday (March 2). Until then, borrowers can return books and periodicals to the Seward Park branch just down East Broadway. The Chatham Square branch of […]