The World Isn’t Ready for Julian Casablancas + the Voidz

Posted on: October 24th, 2014 at 10:24 am by

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DJing at Home Sweet Home in 2013, Photo: The Corpse Corps

The world isn’t ready for Julian Casablancas + The Voidz. Just like The Strokes were the pioneers of the post punk indie revival, the latest endeavor by Julian Casablancas is exponentially kicking it up a notch in the musical avant-garde.

Deceptive in the simplicity of its track titles (“Nintendo Blood,” “Xerox,” “Business Dog”), the band’s latest album Tyranny forces you to take a good hard look in the mirror and confront that blind eye you may turn towards, well, pretty much anything. That’s the power of this album. Politically or personally, it’s one of those rare records that challenges you in any area of your life or belief system.

Emotionally, it’s a flood light on truths that you’ve buried over and over, and demands that you shed your sheep mentality. Musically, it’s so beyond anything you’ve probably heard, that on first pass it’s overwhelming and you’ll want to write it off. Don’t. Because on second pass, the connection between the frenetic electronic keyboard bleeps, discordant chunking guitars, and the drum punching aligns so perfectly with the distortion of Casablancas’ spitfire vocals, everything you listen to after it will pale in comparison.

Regarding the new album Tyranny, Casablancas recently told Rolling Stone:

If anything, I’m just hungry to try to inspire something as big if not bigger [than the Strokes], but with more meaning. You know? Especially now that I’m a little older.

Meaning, indeed. The album is a full-on radical assault that could quite possibly be the soundtrack for a revolution.

Their seemingly retro video for single, “Where No Eagles Fly,” has flashes of the Lower East Side, in between clips of blood dripping onto the camera and a ton of other weird shit you have to see to fully appreciate. Check it out … just wait until after brunch.

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