Revisiting the Original Pitt Street Location of Streit’s Matzo Factory [PHOTOS]

Posted on: January 9th, 2015 at 10:00 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

[Closeup of Dr. Lee and Mrs. Lawrence / Photo: Michael Levine]Still grappling with the recent development that Streit’s Matzo is under contract to sell its longtime Lower East Side headquarters, we figured it apropos to revisit (i.e. re-post) a previous story about its origins. The factory wasn’t always located at 148-154 Rivington Street. In fact, the business was born at 65 Pitt.

Below is the early story, as chronicled by documentarian Michael Levine (behind Streit’s: Matzo and the American Dream) for Bowery Boogie:

The history of Streit’s is inseparable from the history of the Lower East Side, the neighborhood where my own family settled (on Rivington Street, in fact) from Russia over 100 years ago. So during filming of Streit’s: Matzo and the American Dream, there were murmurs about a Streit’s bakery even older than the present one on Rivington, I knew this was a matter for further research. The problem was, the current generation of Streits knew only that that their great-grandfather, founder Aron Streit, had likely operated a basement bakery somewhere on Pitt Street in the early 1900s, where he produced matzo by hand. The exact address had been lost, it seemed for generations, and unlikely to resurface.

Three weeks ago, in conversation with Anthony Zapata, a longtime Streit’s worker who grew up in the neighborhood, he casually dropped a bombshell: he claimed to know the address of the old Pitt Street bakery! He had heard of its location in the early 1980s when a Streit’s employee who had at that time been working with the company for nearly 70 years, drove him past the building where he got his start, baking matzo with Aron Streit himself in the basement of 65 Pitt Street. Anthony and I walked the three or so blocks to the address to find the building intact, with a half-basement that could have easily served as a storefront for the operation.

This image has been archived or removed.

[Dr. Isabella Lee and Mrs. Lawrence in the upstairs apartment of 65 Pitt Street / Photo: Michael Levine]Already in some shock, I posted signs on the door, informing residents of my interest in the building: to document any remaining evidence of the former bakery and bring the Streit family along for a visit.

When I had not heard back the next morning, I decided to take matters into my own hands, and quickly uncovered the name and phone number of the owner of the building.

This image has been archived or removed.

[Dr. Isabella Lee and Mrs. Lawrence renovating the former Streit’s Matzo factory / Photo: Michael Levine]I decided to do a little additional research before making a call and discovered some more of the building’s early history. It had been built in 1850 – some 50 years earlier than the buildings surrounding it, and by the turn of the 20th century seemed to be home to a number of Austrian Jewish immigrants (the Streits themselves emigrated from Austria around this time), housing at once an Austrian Jewish burial society, the headquarters of an Austrian Jewish orphanage, and the residence of a prominent Austrian Rabbi, who ran a Yeshiva in the neighborhood. So, it makes perfect sense that Aron Streit would both find a home here and use the basement for his first matzo bakery.

After Streit’s, the company, moved down the block, and the family to Brooklyn, it seems that Aron Streit’s business partner, Rabbi M. Weinberger, continued producing matzo in the building, an operation that remained until the late 1940s.

This image has been archived or removed.

[View down Pitt Street toward Delancey / Photo: Michael Levine]A search of the New York Times archives produced an article from 1965, about a woman named Isabella Lee, of Michigan, who, with her husband, and her friends, the Lawrence family, purchased the then-abandoned bakery in 1953 for $9,000, and made renovations to the building including disposing of most of the baking equipment. Photos from the article show a comfortable home with no signs of the Streit’s former business. But in an provocative end to the article, it seems that the three-story oven in the building’s backyard survived the renovations, and a rear building, which had been a part of the Streit’s bakery, had been left untouched.

This story has multiple pages:

Recent Stories

Thirsty Customer Robs 7-Eleven on Delancey Street

A customer of the Delancey Street 7-Eleven robbed the store after not having enough cash for beer, police said. Early yesterday morning, a thirsty crook came up to the counter to pay for a few beers, then stole them anyway. He only had $5 and refused to pay for the other groceries. The suspect then […]

Two Buildings at Rivington and Suffolk Hit the Market for $12M

A pair of Lower East Side tenements in the orbit of Essex Crossing is now in the proverbial crosshairs. Both are on the market for a collective $12 million. The two properties are located around the corner from each other at Rivington and Suffolk Streets, and combine for 17,684 square-feet of floor area. The four-story […]

‘Saigon Social’ Begins Build-Out at Former Mission Cantina

For the first time in years, 172 Orchard Street is seeing some activity in the ground floor retail. Not since Mission Cantina closed down in December 2016 has there been movement. Instead, just a revolving door of suitors considering the space. And a never-ending supply of storefront graffiti. Now, renovations are afoot. Restaurateur Helen Nguyen […]

‘Forsythia’ Aims to Make it Where Kitty’s Canteen Couldn’t

With Kitty’s Canteen closed and in the history books, another nightlifer is looking to open a restaurant at 9 Stanton Street. One that revives Italian cuisine at this address. The newcomer is a 24-seat Italian restaurant called Forsythia. The liquor license application questionnaire lists Jacob David Siwak as the principal for the business. At the […]

Man Mugged at Knifepoint Outside Clinton Street Pawn Shop

A man was mugged at knifepoint outside a Clinton Street pawn shop last Tuesday, police said. The victim was reportedly attacked by six crooks, described as African American males, while trying to sell his Juul vape pen to his friend. It all happened outside the pawn shop at 101 Clinton Street. The suspects – one […]