CB3 Unanimously Backs Plan to Address Safety Concerns Along Chrystie Street, Including 2-Way Bike Lane

Posted on: February 13th, 2015 at 5:00 am by
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In a boon to cyclists and pedestrians, the proposal to address safety concerns along Chrystie Street received unanimous backing from Community Board 3 this week. The advisory board had telegraphed initial support last month, so it was pretty much a shoe-in. This grassroots push is largely attributed to bike activist (and Brooklyn Community Board 6 member) Dave “Paco” Abraham who’s long been petitioning for change along this highly-trafficked throughfare.

The Department of Transportation has already singled out Chrystie Street for milling and paving, and will do so later in the spring. Indeed, the last update to this thoroughfare was back in 2008 when the bike lanes were first established here. As it stands, the pavement is riddled with potholes and markings are totally faded. But the scheduled resurfacing is not enough.

The much-touted “Vision Zero” program has reportedly been successful in reducing crashes/casualties across all categories except cyclists. Ergo, more attention must be given to the bike lanes. In particular, the relatively unmarked crossover when 2nd Avenue becomes Chrystie. Southbound bikers on 2nd Avenue can rely on a protected lane, but at East Houston, you’re forced to switch sides due to the two-way traffic pattern. The crossover is actually at 1st Street, but the signage and road markings aren’t clear.

The Transportation subcommittee brought the measure to motion, and obtained unanimous approval. As part of the resolution, the DOT is urged to conduct “visioning sessions” with community stakeholders about how best to remedy the situation, including possible implementation of a (so-far-well-received) two-way bike lane down the length of Chrystie. If proven viable, the city agency is asked to develop a proposal and return to CB3 with designs for critique.

For its part, though, it seems like the DOT is receptive to upgrading Chrystie Street.

And Below is the presentation deck that Abraham assembled to fight the good fight.

Proposal to Upgrade Chrystie Street

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