Michael Chernow of The Meatball Shop Introduces ‘SEAMORE’s’ Seafood Joint to Little Italy

Posted on: February 11th, 2015 at 5:00 am by
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The Meatball Shop is amidst anniversary celebrations for its fifth year in business. For the next couple weeks, as previously disclosed, they’re teaming up with Speedy Romeo Pizza for some special pies. But there’s more to report on that front. The restaurant’s success has since provided a springboard for co-owner Michael Chernow, who currently has another project up his sleeve.

In due course, Chernow will release SEAMORE’s into the pond of Little Italy. As its double-entendre of a name suggests, the establishment, to be headquartered at 390 Broome Street, is a seafood-based restaurant allegedly with affordable price points. Apparently the lease for the corner spot is already signed. “I am still a partner in The Meatball Shop, but have stepped away from the day-to-day to focus all of my energy on SEAMORE’s,” Chernow noted in a recent letter to neighbors in a bid for their support.

So, why the jump from meat of the land to that of the ocean? “My time at TMS has been the most incredible experience,” he continues. “And through the process I have become more and more passionate about seafood, sustainable seafood in particular.”

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That time Meatball Shop was on Fallon

Here is more about the business model of SEAMORE’s and what would-be patrons should expect:

The goal for SEAMORE’s is to offer similar accessibility – via price point, demographic and environment – to The Meatball Shop, but the focus here is local, sustainable seafood instead of meatballs. We have linked up with a few community supported fisheries out in Montauk that will be getting us first dibs on all the under utilized, wild, local and less branded species of fish so that we can afford keep our price point down. We will be introducing these species BACK into the market as they are as delicious as the rest, just never did well based on terrible marketability. Skate, Monk fish, Tile fish, squid, Porgy (Montauk Seabream), Dog fish, Fluke and Flounder just to name a few. We will be rotating bigger brand name fish into the menu when they are in season and running locally.

With all of that said I will need a full liquor license to make this concept work out financially. I do not plan on staying open late, my hours of operation are Sunday through Thursday 9am-11pm Friday and Saturday 9am-12am. I am a restauranteur with track record of establishing neighborhood oriented, successful restaurants that serve great food at a great value. We will be a great neighbor to the residents and that is a promise I’ve made 6 times over the last 5 years and will now make with the Little Italy community. With a small bar of only 9 seats, we plan to have a simple cocktail, wine and beer program that will complement our simple seafood offerings. We will NOT be a loud obnoxious establishment, rather a great fun place to eat that will offer something completely different to the locals and tourist on Mulberry street.

Chernow’s community outreach is telling. He requires full support to make an OP liquor license happen at 390 Broome. Community Board 2 is notoriously tough in that regard. However, given his pedigree and transparence in plans, this should be a shoe-in.

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