‘Scarr’s Pizza’ to Revive Classic Pizza Parlor at 22 Orchard Street

Posted on: August 20th, 2015 at 5:00 am by
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The former Chinese noodle distributor beside Fung Tu at 22 Orchard Street had been on the open market for years. Tombstone leasing signage held court even while it remained an active business. Not too long ago, however, the place finally found its replacement tenant. Enter Scarr’s Pizza.

No, that’s not an allusion to the Lion King or some gimmicky concept. Scarr’s Pizza is named for its eponymous owner, Scarr Pimentel. From what we understand, this won’t be your typical overpriced foodie establishment. At least that’s not what we’re told. Rather, a legit slice joint.

Pimentel, who currently lives on the Lower East Side, intimates his intention is to become a quality pizza place for the neighborhood, without bells and whistles. That’s in line with his experience; a deep pizza pedigree that includes stints at Ballato’s, Lombardi’s, Joe’s, Artichoke, L’asso, GG’s, and Emmett’s. Taking inspiration from the classics, Scarr’s will carry the requisite hallmarks of a seventies-era pizzeria – booth seating, soda fountains, spray fountains (with coconut water), wood paneling, mirrors, bar stools, etc.

Scarr’s Pizza will reportedly mill its own flour and tomatoes (harvested from Gotham Green) onsite. Expect to cough up $3 for a plain slice.

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For the moment, though, there is only a splash page announcing its arrival. Expect an official opening sometime in mid-September. That’s assuming gas is reactivated in the building before then, which is a sore spot.

Indeed, Fung Tu has been operating on a “no gas menu” (and losing money) for the last month. Sources close to the situation allege that contract work on Scarr’s Pizza was the cause of the leak. That there were no issues at 22 Orchard Street until his arrival.

Scarr disputes this, however, noting that the gas problem pre-dates the pizzeria build-out, and that the landlord needed to replace the pressure valve of the main line that leads from the street to the building. Whatever the case may be, hopefully the gas is turned on soon.

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