Parkside Lounge Teams up with Feltman’s of Coney Island for Weekly Hot Dog Pop-Up

Posted on: November 5th, 2015 at 10:33 am by
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Parkside Lounge on East Houston has a bun in the oven, so to speak. Hot dog reboot Feltman’s of Coney Island just began a weekly Wednesday pop-up at the legendary dive. The franks will be served as a $4 snack (with homemade mustard; no ketchup) during their trivia nights for the forseeable future.

Coney Island historian and blogger Michael Quinn revived the brand last spring (and owns the trademark), fifty-one years after the business folded. He’s hosted several pop-ups around town (mainly Brooklyn) since then. And they’re even supplying Augurs Well on St. Mark’s Place, right next door to Crif Dogs.

“My grandfather was a truck driver who knew the man who made Feltman’s hot dogs at a place located directly outside of the Brooklyn Navy Yard,” Quinn tells us. “I believe that I’m right on the money as far as replicating the Frankfurt sausage served at Feltman’s restaurant back in the day. I’m serving the best hot dogs on earth. True to the original.”

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Weiner aficianados might recognize Feltman’s in heartbeat. This is the pioneering company whose founder – Charles Feltman – is credited with inventing the hot dog as we know it back in 1867. Business boomed. That first summer, he reportedly sold 3,684 “Coney Island Red Hots” right out of a cart. Some history from the Coney Island Blog (which Quinn also runs):

The Feltman’s name is preparing a return to Coney Island. German immigrant Charles Feltman has been considered by many the inventor the American hot dog. Sometime around 1867, an Irishman named Donovan built Feltman his first hotdog cart at his shop on Howard ave. in East New York. Feltman boiled these German sausages that he called “Coney Island Red Hots” and put them in between the pastry buns that he made at his Park Slope bakery. That first summer Feltman sold 3,684 of these “Red Hots” from his cart up and down where modern day Surf ave. is now located (modern day Surf ave. is where the shoreline was located at the time, hence the name). The hot dog was born. The rest is history.

Colloquial lore blames Nathan’s for the failure. Apparently Feltman’s employee Nathan Handwerker left the company in 1916 to start Nathan’s, which undercut the whole business. But Quinn disputes the myth; he previously told Gothamist: “These two businesses coexisted for nearly 40 years. People like the whole ‘Nathan’s put Feltman’s out of business’ thing. No! Nathan opened his stand in 1916, Feltman’s lasted until 1954. Feltman’s was a completely different type of place! There was a park there, they showed outdoor movies, and they had the carousel. It was more of an upscale clientele at Nathan’s.”

Meanwhile, Quinn is still jonesin to open a brick-and-mortar location of Feltman’s somewhere in Coney Island.

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