Lazy Susan and Shrine Gallery the Newest Entrants to Henry Street Scene

Posted on: December 30th, 2015 at 5:19 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

Henry Street is the latest gallerist frontier on the Lower East Side. A slow trickle of showrooms has opened up the spot – especially the block between Jefferson and Clinton. (So have developers, by the way; look next door.) Two off-the-beaten-path galleries that recently foundered are being replaced with more of the same.

Striking out from the fertile pastures of the Con Artist Collective on Ludlow Street, Brian Shevlin is opening Lazy Susan at 191 Henry Street. Previously an annex for Rebecca Jampol Projects. The idea for this spot was forged six months ago with the help of four other likeminded artists – Michael Sharp, Dean Millien (foil artist), Jill Connor, and Steve Rivera (formerly of Novella) – some of whom are veterans of the Ludlow program. Inspiration, we’re told, was actually the City Bird gallery that briefly occupied the west store at this address. That space, meanwhile, is the future home of the Shrine Gallery.

Lazy Susan spins between the principals to cultivate creativity, seeking alternative ways to present art and pay the rent. Not the traditional retail route of buying art-off the wall. From what we gather, a pitch for proposals is released, artists are chosen, and the space is bequeathed for a set period of time. This rotating approach is in contrast to the typical artist roster. The opportunity cost of this non-traditional approach is a steady cash flow. Therefore, the crew may also bank on random pop-up exhibits (and marketing stunts) to bridge the gap.

This image has been archived or removed.

When Lazy Susan soft opens later today, though, it’ll be as host to Endless Editions – basement tenant – who’s throwing their “closing sale” with a show in the ground-level gallery (zines and art publications for sale).

When pressed about the volatile gallery scene and artists fleeing the neighborhood (and NYC), Shevlin talks up the survival-of-the-fittest approach. He chalks it up to artists these days becoming “creative entrepreneurs” in order to stay afloat and keep the city from hemorrhaging it’s creative. “Our job is to figure out how to find our own way to keep (the city art scene) vibrant.”

Recent Stories

‘Parkour Expo’ this Weekend Atop Seward Park High School

Parkour enthusiasts take note: Move NYC is headed to the Lower East Side this weekend. Nomadic outfit The Movement Creative is setting up a temporary rooftop playground, composed of of 8,000lbs of metal pipe, joints, and wooden beams atop the New Design High School (nee Seward Park High School at 350 Grand Street). Movement Creative […]

66 Clinton Street Sees New Life as 8-Story Luxury Development

Two months ago, New Life of New York City sold its flagship building at 66 Clinton Street and relocated to Alphabet City. Next up, luxury living. Just last month, the nascent landowners – Vault Development and TLM Equities – filed paperwork with Department of Buildings for the new development. Set to rise eight stories, the […]

Mayor de Blasio’s Flawed Jail Plan Leaves Inmates Further from Home [Op-Ed]

As summer winds down, we head ever-closer to the city-wide ULURP hearings on the proposed borough-based prison plan. All said and done, it’s been one big farce the past several months, through various public hearings in four boroughs held by city agencies (save the respective community boards). At each turn, neighborhoods rallied to oppose Mayor […]

The Ten-Story Development Now Atop the East Village’s Last Gas Station

It was the neighborhood’s last gas station to shutter. Now, it’s a ten-story luxury development. Foundation was first poured for 11 Avenue C way back in December 2016. The timeline upon its conception two years earlier was a fourteen-month construction period. As of this week, the superstructure is pretty much topped out. Rotwein + Blake […]

Eldridge Street’s Formosa Cafe Folds

Casual Taiwanese establishment, Formosa Cafe, is finished. The Eldridge Street hangout hung it up earlier this month. Token tombstone signage now hangs from the cartoony marquee. The Lower East Side location is survived by an outpost in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Formosa debuted at 34 Eldridge back in May 2015. It was a large, accommodating space […]