Delancey Street Church Courts Developers for Redevelopment Into 12-Story Structure

Posted on: February 4th, 2016 at 5:00 am by

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Snowy Church, January 2015

Just the other day, we were thinking about how the time was likely nigh for the church at the southeast corner of Delancey and Norfolk Streets. The house of worship has certainly seen better days, weathering before our very eyes.

Well, looks like the Templo Adventista del Septimo (Seventh Day Adventists) congregation is now courting prospective developers to demolish and build anew.

According to a press release from the church – formerly a synagogue, by the way – the group seeks a developer to purchase their air rights, raze 126 Forsyth, and construct a new building altogether. The church itself would retain the first three floors (and own outright), but there would apparently be 27,000 square-feet of residential space up above.

Zoning along the Delancey Street corridor allows for maximum height of twelve stories.

Price sought for the privilege of developing the high-profile Lower East Side corner is $7 million in cash. With the caveat that the lucky bidder find a temporary location where the Church can convene twice a week, and for four full weeks during specific times.

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The loss of this building is crushing. Despite its disheveled appearance, it’s one of the more historical sites in the neighborhood. The building itself was erected in 1890 by a renowned architect named Josiah Cleveland Cody, and was a temporary home to a missionary group. Before long, a group of Lithuanian Jews from outside Vilna settled there, making it headquarters for the Chevrah Poel Zedek Anschei Illia. A renovation in 1909 brought retail storefronts, and extra money to the congregation. But by the mid-1920s, the synagogue was in decline, thanks in part to “changes in the neighborhood.” Nevertheless, the tight-knit community remained there until the 1960s when the building was finally sold. Jewish stars of David are still visible in the windows.

[h/t Curbed]

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