What it Looks Like to Destroy 200 Years of Bowery History for an 8-Story Condo-Hotel

Posted on: February 9th, 2016 at 5:00 am by
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This here is what it looks like to destroy two hundred years of local history at 138-142 Bowery. Two months after the arrival of demolition scaffolding, the row of historic structures, part of which dates back to the 1790s, is being dismantled as we speak.

Despite the pair of partial stop-work orders issued last week for safety failures, such as lack of overhead protection of the “adjacent building’s rear yard.”

Nevertheless, the end game remains unchanged. These three buildings were sold to Emmut Properties as part of the five-property, $47 million portfolio back in December (total assemblage is 134-142 Bowery). Plans for the eight-story development are still in play, though remain “disapproved” by the Department of Buildings. And to that end, the developers wish to “preserve the look and feel of the Bowery.” No joke.

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As previously reported, the 44,000 square-foot replacement will be divvied up between commercial hotel (30,825 square-feet) and residential use (13,859). In plain English, that means 46 hotel rooms and 21 apartments. A retail tenant and rooftop “recreation area” are also included in the pending plans. Timeline for completion is next year, though that seems unlikely.

Meanwhile, 134 and 136 Bowery – historic in their own right – are both spared for the time being; there are no demolition permits on file at the moment. These twin structures were erected around 1798 for Samuel Delaplaine and during their long history housed the Carmel Chapel of Reverend Dooley, the New York City Mission and the art studios of Eva Hesse, Billy Apple and Gilda Pervin.

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140 Bowery, March 2011

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