What it Looks Like to Destroy 200 Years of Bowery History for an 8-Story Condo-Hotel

Posted on: February 9th, 2016 at 5:00 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

This here is what it looks like to destroy two hundred years of local history at 138-142 Bowery. Two months after the arrival of demolition scaffolding, the row of historic structures, part of which dates back to the 1790s, is being dismantled as we speak.

Despite the pair of partial stop-work orders issued last week for safety failures, such as lack of overhead protection of the “adjacent building’s rear yard.”

Nevertheless, the end game remains unchanged. These three buildings were sold to Emmut Properties as part of the five-property, $47 million portfolio back in December (total assemblage is 134-142 Bowery). Plans for the eight-story development are still in play, though remain “disapproved” by the Department of Buildings. And to that end, the developers wish to “preserve the look and feel of the Bowery.” No joke.

This image has been archived or removed.

As previously reported, the 44,000 square-foot replacement will be divvied up between commercial hotel (30,825 square-feet) and residential use (13,859). In plain English, that means 46 hotel rooms and 21 apartments. A retail tenant and rooftop “recreation area” are also included in the pending plans. Timeline for completion is next year, though that seems unlikely.

Meanwhile, 134 and 136 Bowery – historic in their own right – are both spared for the time being; there are no demolition permits on file at the moment. These twin structures were erected around 1798 for Samuel Delaplaine and during their long history housed the Carmel Chapel of Reverend Dooley, the New York City Mission and the art studios of Eva Hesse, Billy Apple and Gilda Pervin.

This image has been archived or removed.

140 Bowery, March 2011

Recent Stories

‘Open Streets’ Create Open Trash Mess on Lower East Side

The intersection of Orchard and Broome Streets has become a dumping grounds on weekends, according to several neighbors. Comparisons abound to Hell Square immediately north of Delancey Street. This block, like many others, takes advantage of the city’s “Open Streets” plan that allows restaurants to push onto the streets and sidewalks to serve customers. A […]

Getting by: Hugging Trees with Vicki Rovere on Ludlow Street

In our ongoing series “Getting By,” Lower East Side residents and business owners share, in their own words, how they’re navigating the new normal of pandemic times. In this installment, operator of the longtime Ludlow Street Free Store, Vicki Rovere, penned her thoughts. I live alone, and after a while in lockdown, I really hankered […]

Sam Chang Plans 13-Story Hotel to Replace Chinatown Garage

Another downtown parking garage is doomed for replacement, with a new hotel on the way. Down at 62 Mulberry Street, the five-floor car-park is ready for redevelopment. Prolific hotelier Sam Chang is gunning to construct a thirteen-story beast, with design by frequent collaborator Gene Kaufman Architect. The proposed hotel will boast 103 keys spread across […]

Nitecap Says Goodnight to Rivington Street After Six Years

Nitecap probably needs one right about now. The basement bar – founded in 2014 by David Kaplan and Alex Day of Death & Co. fame – announced its permanent closure on Instagram last night, citing challenges due to COVID-19 and debts still owed. Nitecap closed down, with the rest of the city, at the outset […]

Yeah Yeah Yeahs Celebrate 20 Years by Sharing Footage from First Show at Mercury Lounge

You’re old. But you were young then. Perhaps you caught a fringe group at Mercury Lounge that night twenty years ago. Yeah Yeah Yeahs were just another on a stacked bill September 25, 2000, alongside other relative unknowns, including Candy Darlings, Kid Congo Powers, and The White Stripes (who had released their debut record months […]