Your First Look at the Luxury Development that Eliminated 200 Years of Bowery History

Posted on: April 8th, 2016 at 5:12 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

That’s all she wrote. Two months after the death shroud appeared, 138-142 Bowery is gone. A stinging sight of scattered debris and open air. Pulverized to usher in an age of luxury residence on the site.

Gone is the sidewalk bridge, carted away yesterday.

Per previous reports, these three structures were sold to Emmut Properties as part of the five-property, $47 million portfolio back in December (total assemblage is 134-142 Bowery). Plans for the eight-story residential development remain “disapproved” by the Department of Buildings.

This image has been archived or removed.

Full description from the mouth of the beast. Note the absence of talk about the hotel composition, which was included in early Department of Buildings filings that preceded Emmut Properties.

The new structure will have ground floor and mezzanine retail space, as well as residential units on the upper floors. Due to the height restriction in the historic neighborhood, the building will be eight stories tall.

Emmut Properties realizes this building site has a great deal of history, and we want to do everything possible to preserve the look and feel of the Bowery. The development that is planned will not only revitalize this section of the Bowery into a more appealing place to live and do business, but we hope that it also increases the quality of life for the people currently living in the area.

This image has been archived or removed.

The new 138 Bowery, Photo: Emmut Properties

As conveyed in the listing literature, the elimination of 138-142 Bowery from the neighborhood effectively destroys invaluable area history. Indeed, number 140 dated back to the 1790s and was originally owned by men associated with the butchering trade. It was later a shoe store and millinery (“Callahan the Hatter”), among other functions. As a testament to its perseverence, the architecture persevered for more than two centuries; until 2011, when the owner lopped off the trademark dormers to nullify any possibility of landmarking.

Recent Stories

There was a Slashing on Essex Street Yesterday Morning

A Brooklyn man was slashed across the face early yesterday morning on Essex Street, police said. At roughly 3:00am Thursday, a 35-year-old male victim was struck with a sharp object outside 153 Essex Street (Two Bit’s Retro Arcade and the former Legacy Deli), causing a laceration and bleeding to the left side of his face. He […]

That Shooting of 3 Men at Falucka Hookah Bar on Bleecker Street

In case you missed the news, three men were shot at the Falucka hookah bar on Bleecker Street last Sunday morning. According to a follow-up report in The Villager, a fight reportedly broke out inside the lounge – located a couple blocks from Washington Square Park – shortly before 4am. The altercation escalated into gunfire […]

‘Dripped Coffee’ Joins Hell Square Cafe Roster

Over on Allen Street, it’s manicures to mochas. Another coffee shop for Hell Square is in the offing. A minuscule affair called Dripped Coffee is on its way to 150 Allen Street. Not much is known yet about this SEO-unfriendly business. This particular shop previously played host to a nail salon, which closed down some […]

Randall’s Barbecue Adds Signage on Grand Street Ahead of July Opening

Randall’s Barbecue is nearing the finish line on Grand Street, bringing traif to the onetime Kosher pizzeria. Contractors last week installed the new brown awning, signaling the end of another commercial vacancy in this low-rise stretch. As previously reported, proprietor Jared Male, a pit-master veteran of both Hill Country and Dinosaur BBQ in Harlem, plans to […]

‘Brooklyn Industries’ Ditches SoHo After 14 Years

Brooklyn Industries departed Lafayette Street within the last couple weeks. The exterior flag is gone, and the store is vacant with token butcher paper taped to the windows. The Brooklyn-based mini-chain was born in the late Nineties, and eventually opened the flagship in 2001. The second store at 290 Lafayette – Manhattan’s first – followed […]