Your First Look at the Luxury Development that Eliminated 200 Years of Bowery History

Posted on: April 8th, 2016 at 5:12 am by
This image has been archived or removed.

That’s all she wrote. Two months after the death shroud appeared, 138-142 Bowery is gone. A stinging sight of scattered debris and open air. Pulverized to usher in an age of luxury residence on the site.

Gone is the sidewalk bridge, carted away yesterday.

Per previous reports, these three structures were sold to Emmut Properties as part of the five-property, $47 million portfolio back in December (total assemblage is 134-142 Bowery). Plans for the eight-story residential development remain “disapproved” by the Department of Buildings.

This image has been archived or removed.

Full description from the mouth of the beast. Note the absence of talk about the hotel composition, which was included in early Department of Buildings filings that preceded Emmut Properties.

The new structure will have ground floor and mezzanine retail space, as well as residential units on the upper floors. Due to the height restriction in the historic neighborhood, the building will be eight stories tall.

Emmut Properties realizes this building site has a great deal of history, and we want to do everything possible to preserve the look and feel of the Bowery. The development that is planned will not only revitalize this section of the Bowery into a more appealing place to live and do business, but we hope that it also increases the quality of life for the people currently living in the area.

This image has been archived or removed.

The new 138 Bowery, Photo: Emmut Properties

As conveyed in the listing literature, the elimination of 138-142 Bowery from the neighborhood effectively destroys invaluable area history. Indeed, number 140 dated back to the 1790s and was originally owned by men associated with the butchering trade. It was later a shoe store and millinery (“Callahan the Hatter”), among other functions. As a testament to its perseverence, the architecture persevered for more than two centuries; until 2011, when the owner lopped off the trademark dormers to nullify any possibility of landmarking.

Recent Stories

City Turbo Charges Essex Street Municipal Garage with Electric Car Stations

The municipal parking garage on Essex Street is charged up for a new future. That of electric vehicles. Last week, the Department of Transportation unveiled four new fast-charging stations in the carpark. The addition on the Lower East Side is the first in a rollout across the city for the technology, which provides an 80-percent […]

Bay Area Export ‘Beloved Cafe’ Aims to Serve by Month End on Allen Street

The Lower East Side will soon be flowing with golden milk. Beloved Cafe – a San Francisco-based vegan eatery and juice bar – is headed to 196 Allen Street. As previously reported, the new location is the first expansion for the company beyond its Bay Area environs. Ownership promises that the new cafe is to […]

Economy Candy Rebounds with New Store Layout

Economy Candy officially returned from the pandemic sidelines with a block party and fresh store layout. The celebration involved the Big Gay Ice Cream truck outside 108 Rivington Street, and Gotham chocolates parked inside doling free samples. In the remodel, the store did not lose any of its old-school-warehouse-meets-Willy-Wonka charm. And it’s now substantially easier […]

Now Reopened, Blue Moon Hotel Pins Survival on New Restaurant and Bakery

The Blue Moon Hotel on Orchard Street hopes that diversification in its fifteenth year might bolster the bottom line. As part of its reinvention (and reopening), the Settenbrino family is looking to become more than just a “museum hotel” by creating food and beverage options. Specifically, two onsite establishments – Settenbrini’s enoteca and the Sweet […]

Woodward Gallery Honors 9/11 Anniversary with Monthlong Exhibition

Amidst the many twentieth anniversary observations of 9/11, the Woodward Gallery is presenting a different type of tribute. It’s current exhibition, which is designed to be easily seen from the street even when the gallery is closed, consists of prescient works of art. “Observing 9/11: Breen, Bridges & Corn September 2021” showcases three poignant artworks, […]