Taking Stock of Wallplay’s Graffiti Goodbye on Delancey Ahead of 12-Story Condo Conversion [PHOTOS]

Posted on: July 7th, 2016 at 5:18 am by
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Graffiti is now inextricably linked to the gentrification life cycle. Art is the soft cool factor now used by the upper crust to sell the grit and grandeur of a so-called up-and-coming neighborhood. And it’s now en vogue, apparently, to decorate buildings on the docket for demolition.

Case in point, what’s happening at 118 Orchard Street (formerly Moscot). That’s where the creative agency, Wallplay, held court the last few years until last week, always under imminent threat of re-development. It finally closed on June 30 with a “graffiti goodbye” called “Exquisite Corpse,” which was a clarion call to tag the premises.

Photographer Nick McManus captured the final night (seen in gallery below), and shared the images with us. He snapped photos of the crews bombing the walls.

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Helm Equities (aka David Escava) purchased 118 Orchard Street (aka 86 Delancey) in 2012 for $4.8 million. This transaction was the proverbial nail in the coffin that forced Moscot across to its new home south of the border. (It had been there since 1936.) The developer subsequently filed preliminary paperwork with the Department of Buildings in September 2014 to construct a twelve-story mixed-use tower on this larger parcel. It’s languished in “disapproval” status ever since.

At a height of 120 feet, the high rise is composed of 29,437 square-feet of floor area with twenty-four units. Floors three through eight will carry three apartments each, with duplexes rounding out floors nine through twelve. The ground-level retail space is 5,769 square-feet, and zoned for “use group 6,” which includes a restaurant.

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