Reader Report: DOT Fails to Recognize 2-Way Protected Bike Lane with Chrystie Street Markings

Posted on: October 5th, 2016 at 9:44 am by

This image has been archived or removed.

Photo: Dave “Paco” Abraham

It looks like the Department of Transportation might be confused about the incoming two-way protected bike lane on Chrystie Street. Blame probably rests on the bureacracy of two different projects happening in the same spot.

Brooklyn bicycle activist Dave “Paco” Abraham alerted us to the striping stenciled on the fresh pavement at Grand and Chrystie Streets. (Water main work just completed at this intersection.) The sketched arrows appear to indicate the status quo setup of an UNPROTECTED bike lane, which is not the protected two-way lane that DOT promised the community.

Was this just an oversight? Either way, it’ll probably spell delays.

As previously reported, the plan to reconfigure the Chrystie Street bike lane is two years in the making. Community Board 3 first backed the project in February 2015, but the DOT didn’t officially green light until this past spring. Here is a quick summation of what’s happening…

This image has been archived or removed.

Photo: DOT

  • The two-way bike lane is relegated to the east side of Chrystie Street, protected by jersey barriers, flexible delineators, and parked cars. It eliminates the need for southbound cyclists to cross the street to link up with the path (current situation).
  • Pedestrians benefit from the plan with the addition of medians at Rivington, Stanton, and East Second Streets. The concrete island at Canal Street is also moving ten feet to the west.
  • The two-way bike lane allows for a seamless transition from Second Avenue to Chrystie Street. As it stands, southbound cyclists must cross over at Houston Street while heading southbound, only to cross back for Manhattan Bridge access.
  • Adding a second southbound left turn lane at Delancey Street (protected signal), but at the expense of ten parking spots on the west side. The plan also includes the elimination of left-turn traffic from northbound motorists onto Delancey from Chrystie.
  • There will reportedly be specific traffic signals for bikers at each intersection along Chrystie.

Recent Stories

I May Survive Coronavirus, but My Friendships Won’t [OP-ED]

While I may survive the COVID-19 pandemic, some of my friendships won’t. As xenophobia grips the masses, racist attacks and harassment against Asians are on the rise at home and abroad. While many would condemn attacks or harassment on social media platforms, how many would intervene when it involves friends? Sadly, my guess is probably not […]

Tenement Museum Faces ‘Extraordinary Crisis’ Amidst COVID-19 Shutdown

The Tenement Museum is struggling to stay afloat, as the COVID-19 shutdown eliminated foot traffic and steady funding. Since closing to the public on March 14, the Lower East Side museum laid off 13 full-time employees (out of 66) – mostly from marketing, visitor services, and gift shop – and told another 40 not to […]

Grindr Date at Baruch Houses Gone Awry as Man Robbed with Taser, Amidst COVID-19 Crisis

A man was threatened with a taser and robbed in the Baruch Houses this week after a Gindr meetup gone awry, police said. The victim had been corresponding with another man on the Grindr dating app, and arranged an early-morning meetup at the Baruch Houses on March 23. (Nevermind, COVID-19.) At 7:30am, the victim arrived […]

Bowery Mission Serving Daily Meals to those in Need, Rain or Shine

While thousands across the city are isolating at home, there are others who don’t have many – if any – options for food or shelter during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Bowery Mission is helping to curtail that by handing out meals to people at their Bowery site. Earlier this week, staff and volunteers distributed “to-go” […]

In Memoriam: Big Steve of East 3rd Street

A fixture on the Lower East Side for decades, Juan “Stevie” Guzman passed away last week of heart complications. He was kind, gentle and hilarious. Affectionately known as “Lil’ Steve,” and later, “Big Stevie,” he and his family lived on East 3rd Street and First Avenue since the 1960s. Many of of his relatives still […]