COST and DAIN Paste up 7-Story Collaboration on Allen and Delancey

Posted on: December 20th, 2016 at 5:10 am by
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The southeast corner of Allen and Delancey Streets is becoming its own beacon of street art, continuing a trajectory most recently forged by “The New Allen” project. Latest is the old bank-to-condo building at 77 Delancey, which now boasts a seven-story collaboration between legendary wheat-paster COST and Brooklyn-based DAIN.

It took more than two weeks for the duo to complete the project. In essence, the colorful Hollywood glamor of DAIN’s four-story mural is deflated by the simiplicity of COST’s token name tag.

The new double-shot art joins the recent Tats Cru piece (i.e. the street signs) that helped launch the Fat Free Art gallery, and sits above the Famous Oyster Bar neons requisitioned by Grey Lady.

Ubiquity is no longer a COST M.O., it seems. He last made headlines a couple years ago, having been charged with criminal mischief, making graffiti, and possession of a graffiti instrument in connection with nine separate graffiti incidents in October 2014. But he’s made it count with this latest placement.

As for 77-79 Delancey…

The iconic structure was erected in 1914 as headquarters of the Bank of the United States. At the time, many immigrants mistakenly believed the NY-chartered bank was a federal government institution. Despite such confusion, business prospered, with the total number of depositors ballooning to 400,000. The success was short-lived, however, as the bank was one of the first casualties in the crash of 1929. It finally succumbed in 1932.

Shortly thereafter, the building became headquarters for the venerable Hebrew Publishing Company. Founded in 1891, the company released a wide range of secular and religious publications in Hebrew, English, and Yiddish. It occupied the building until 1976.

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