New Museum Adds 2 Galleries this Week as Part of Expansion into 231 Bowery

Posted on: September 25th, 2017 at 9:26 am by

The forty-year-old New Museum, on the Bowery for eleven years already, is on course to renovate the adjacent property and increase its overall footprint. Starting this week – more than a year after first announcing the expansion – the ground level will be ready for a slate of art programming.

“The expansion effort will ultimately enable the Museum to double its exhibition galleries, expand educational initiatives, improve circulation, add more public amenities, and improve the visitor experience,” a recent press release notes.

The New Museum will present several special exhibitions during this fall 2017 season and will debut two galleries in the adjacent building at 231 Bowery. These additional showrooms are part of the first of two phases in the expansion. The spaces will be connected to the museum lobby, along with a new storefront window display. Exhibitions devoted to emerging artists Kahlil Joseph and Petrit Halilaj will inaugurate the space on Wednesday (September 27).

From the mailbag:

The South Galleries preserve the character of the 231 Bowery building’s original loft spaces, where many artists worked and exhibited. Alex Da Corte will inaugurate the storefront window of the building with an installation, the first in a new series paying homage to the window installations that the New Museum mounted in the 1980s. Kahlil Joseph’s exhibition, the first solo presentation of his work in New York, will debut a new film that draws inspiration from photographer Roy DeCarava (1919–2009) to consider the dimensions of past, present, and future in Harlem and New York City. Petrit Halilaj’s exhibition will present an ambitious new project that begins in Runik, Kosovo, the city in which the artist was born and the site of one of the earliest Neolithic settlements in the region; it will trace residents’ recollections of remaining archaeological objects as personal origin stories. “Kahlil Joseph” is curated by Natalie Bell, Assistant Curator, and Massimiliano Gioni, Edlis Neeson Artistic Director. “Petrit Halilaj” is curated by Helga Christoffersen, Assistant Curator. “Alex Da Corte: Harvest Moon” is curated by Margot Norton, Curator.

This southern annex isn’t surprising. It was part of the plan all along. The New Museum purchased 231 Bowery back in 2011 (four years after its stack of boxes opened) with the intention of adding more space for operations. Daroma Restaurant Equipment was a victim and moved down the block to Delancey.

January 2011

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