DHS Maintains it Has No Plans to Convert Delancey Holiday Inn into Homeless Shelter

Posted on: November 7th, 2017 at 9:49 am by

The Holiday Inn at 150 Delancey Street is currently housing a small number of homeless individuals, the city confirmed in response to our exclusive yesterday. More specifically, some rooms are earmarked as a temporary “emergency shelter.”

“We are currently using rooms in this commercial hotel to shelter homeless New Yorkers who would otherwise be turned out onto the street—and we have no plans to convert this location into ongoing shelter capacity,” Department of Homeless Services Deputy Press Secretary Arianna Fishman clarified. “Our use of this location is on a temporary basis to ensure our homeless neighbors are supported as they get back on their feet, not turned out into the streets, while we implement our plan to expand ongoing high-quality borough-based shelter capacity and finally end the use of ineffective stop-gap measures, like commercial hotels, that date back decades.”

Fishman also reiterated that the city has zero desire to convert 150 Delancey Street into a full-blown shelter. There are no proposals related to this location, she says, nor have they discussed transforming the property into an “ongoing shelter capacity.”

And regarding “emergency use of hotels” for housing, the official word…

In compliance with the right to shelter court order, the City places people in hotels under emergency situations when there is not enough shelter capacity on a given night. Until we are able to fully implement our plan and since the City is under court order to provide shelter under emergency circumstances at all times there will be some cases in which we need to provide emergency shelter and place families and individuals in hotels if we have reached capacity—and we notify communities regarding the use of these locations as early in advance of use as possible. Previously, the City did not provide notice regarding use of commercial hotels in emergency situations to meet immediate capacity needs, but we have updated our policies so we now provide notice to communities regarding emergency use of commercial as soon as we are able, and no later than the day we must utilize these locations to meet emergency needs. We are using commercial hotels as a bridge to provide emergency shelter to homeless New Yorkers, including families with children, who would otherwise be turned out into the street.

Needless to say, it appears that the community at large did not receive much notice about this emergency shelter situation, which has allegedly been ongoing the last few weeks.

Recent Stories

Burned-out Bulbs on the Williamsburg Bridge for Months

Lights are burning a bit dimmer over on the Williamsburg Bridge. Readers point out that numerous bulbs lining the Manhattan side of the span are dark. And have been for months. Presumably the necessary approvals must snake through the bureaucracy before the necklace lighting is fully restored. So, it might be awhile yet. Department of […]

Report: Protected Bike Lanes Underway for Alphabet City

Protected bike lanes may be on the way to Alphabet City. With the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project on the near horizon, the Department of Transportation is attempting to make good on its recent promise to cyclists, by improving city bike infrastructure surrounding the project. “DOT, in consultation with Council members and other local stakeholders, […]

Henry Street Settlement Facility on Delancey Readies Move to Essex Crossing

The Henry Street Settlement is Essex Crossing-bound. In part. Its Workforce Development Center is relocating from the corner of Essex and Delancey Streets – atop the McDonald’s – to a new spot at 178 Broome (aka Site 6). Signs on the front door of the center alert locals of the imminent move. Basically, Site 6 […]

Samesa is the First Vendor Casualty in the New Essex Market

Open only six months, the first vendor of the new Essex Market has gone belly up. Not one of the long-timers, though. Samesa ended its brief run earlier this month. Established by brothers Max and Eli Sussman in 2016, Samesa first announced its Lower East Side grab-and-go stall one year ago. The Middle Eastern restaurant […]

‘GoNightclubbing’ with Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong at The 72 Gallery [INTERVIEW]

Thirty-nine years ago, a new nightclub called Danceteria featured a video installation which recreating a suburban living room. The twist was that the giant old-school TV, housed in a mid-century wood cabinet, wasn’t playing reruns of I Love Lucy. Instead, there was a live feed of bands such as Iggy Pop, The Dead Boys, and […]