LPC Makes it Easy to Get to Know Your Neighborhood Landmarks [MAPS]

Posted on: December 22nd, 2017 at 5:07 am by

The Landmarks Preservation Commission just leveled up its “Discover NYC Landmarks” interactive map.

What was once a cumbersome and limited database is now a user-friendly treasure trove of information on nearly 34,000 historic buildings within the City’s 141 historic districts. This upgrade complements its existing accessible information on the more than 1,400 individual landmarks, and boasts one of the largest and most comprehensive historic building data collection created by any municipal preservation agency in the US.

The launch of the enhanced web map will not only allow for a greater appreciation and understanding of our city’s rich architectural and cultural heritage, but it also brings greater transparency, efficiency, and public access to the agency,” said Landmarks Preservation Commission Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan. “This information is invaluable to all stakeholders, including homeowners who want to know more about their buildings, community groups, preservation advocates, historians, academics, and anyone who walks through New York City’s neighborhoods and marvels at our buildings.

The Discover NYC Landmarks map is accessible from computers, smartphones, and tablets. New features include pop-ups for each building in historic districts with info such as construction date, architect, style, building type and original use. It also contains advanced search criteria and filtering, by characteristics such as architectural style, architect, building type and era of construction.

The hope is to create a greater understanding and appreciation of New York City’s historic buildings and neighborhoods, but also to play to the larger LPC initiative in increasing efficiency and provideing greater transparency and public access in the ongoing battle of landmarking. After all, knowledge is power.

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