Developers Outline Plans for 2-Tower Housing at Scorched LES Synagogue Site

Posted on: January 11th, 2018 at 5:00 am by

From the fire-scorched remains of Beth Hamedrash Hagadol will rise a residential complex comprised of two towers, one of which is three times the size of the other. It’s all part of a proposal by the Chinese-American Planning Council (CPC) and developer Gotham Organization to impart an “intergenerational community anchored by neighborhood retail and community facility tenants.”

Last night – a full eight months after the fire – the partnership presented its preliminary plans to Community Board 3.

The overall project spans the full block of Broome Street from Norfolk to Suffolk Street, and comprises both a mid-rise (10 stories) and high-rise (30 stories) component. It’ll occupy the parking lot of the Hong Ning senior living next door and the synagogue site.

Below are some nuts and bolts:

  • The 10-story building is at the Norfolk Street corner and will carry 88 affordable apartments for seniors; the 30-story building is at Suffolk Street and boasts 400 apartments, 100 of which are permanently affordable. Total residential is 375,000 square-feet.
  • CPC retains ownership of the land, but granted Gotham Organization a 99-year ground lease. CPC will own a 40,000 square-foot commercial condo as permanent headquarters for its nonprofit, allowing it to consolidate operations from around the city.
  • Beth Hamedrash Hagadol retains ownership of its land, but will own a 4,000 square-foot commercial condo in the new development. Remnants of the 167-year-old house of worship are incorporated into the overall design.
  • Retail storefront facing Broome Street that’s 10,000 square-feet, with additional 10,000 square-feet in the basement.
  • Outdoor space that can be utilized by residents, CPC, and the synagogue.
  • The affordable building will cantilever over the remains of the synagogue.
  • Architect of record is Dattner Architects.

Timing of the hearing was definitely curious given the de Blasio administration’s about-face Tuesday on a promise to deliver affordable senior housing at the city-owned 30 Pike Street. However, the team was adamant that while the city came to them this past fall to increaseng the senior housing in this development, a Rivington House quid-pro-quo was never mentioned.

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