Luscious Jackson Singer has Solo Art Exhibition at 198 Allen Street

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 at 5:06 am by

Jill Cunniff’s “Ladyfingers,” as featured on Luscious Jackson’s 1999 LP, Electric Honey.

Fans of Luscious Jackson will be happy to hear that New York City’s own Jill Cuniff has an art show happening all weekend at 198 Allen Street.

The Luscious Jackson singer-songwriter/bassist unveils “Lyric and Word Paintings” at the perennial pop-up tonight, showcasing a collection of abstract watercolor and mixed media paintings, some of which feature some familiar Luscious Jackson lyrics (for more, get a glimpse of what Cunniff is up to in her art studio via her own Instagram). Festivities kick off at 7 pm and the event is free.

Cunniff will also perform a special acoustic set that will include songs from her 2007 solo effort, City Beach, plus select Luscious Jackson tunes.

Before Cunniff and Gabby Glaser got together to form Luscious Jackson in 1991, Cunniff was well immersed in art while attending Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music and the Arts. Always inspired by her native NYC surroundings, particularly the graffiti-draped subway cars of the ’80s, Cunniff went on to hone her own vibrant style while attending Hunter College here in Manhattan. She later studied at the University of California at Berkeley while under the tutelage of renowned Bay Area figurative painter Joan Brown.

Jill Cunniff

“I’ve been painting my whole life,” Cunniff says in a press statement. “As a teenager, I used to paint and write songs kind of like a hand off, switching between the two over the course of an afternoon. I listen to music when I am doing artwork; it’s a big part of the process. I’m influenced by New York City’s streets and the posters and writings that pile up on top of each other, creating layers of color and text. I came of age in 1980s downtown NYC when graffiti and hip-hop met punk. Later, I was introduced to the work of Bay Area Figurative artists while studying painting at U.C. Berkeley, and their glowing landscapes also had a deep influence. So my paintings have elements that are both hectic and serene.”

Presented By PMM ART PROJECTS, “Lyric and Word Paintings” will be on display through Sunday, September 23.

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