Clinton Street Access to Williamsburg Bridge to be Restricted During L Train Shutdown

Posted on: October 29th, 2018 at 5:00 am by

The Department of Transportation this month announced that Clinton Street access to the Williamsburg Bridge will be significantly reduced during the dreaded L-Train Shutdown, beginning next spring.

According to the city agency, this chokepoint – the subject of outspoken neighborhood complaints for years – will be restricted to drivers during the HOV-3 hours (5:00am to 10:00pm). This affects the roughly 70-percent of southbound FDR drivers who take the Grand Street exit for the bridge. Of that pool, roughly 600 cars per hour turn right at peak times; half that use Norfolk Street for the bridge. (See presentation below.)

As such, during the allegedly-15-month Canarsie Tunnel job, bridge-bound vehicles will instead funnel through the under-utilized route of Norfolk Street to Delancey, where there would be “high occupancy vehicle enforcement” during the HOV-3 times.

Other short-term measures taken to curb the traffic bottlenecks forever building here:

  • Williamsburg Bridge Wayfinding signage on FDR altered to remove “ALT” and any mention of the span from Grand Street exit signs.
  • Construction barrels removed from Broome Street.
  • Clarification of bridge wayfinding signage to encourage usage of Norfolk Street for bridge access from Grand.
  • Grand Street traffic-signal progression is extended during evening hours.
  • Relocated the illuminated “No Honking” sign further upstream of Clinton and Grand.

“What we’re trying to do here is reduce little by little the amount of traffic that’s going up Clinton Street,” Sean Quinn, DOT senior director of bicycle and pedestrian programs, told the transportation subcommittee of Community Board 3 earlier this month. “We’re taking little pieces of the traffic here and there and trying to get them to use different routes and sort of free up the roadway capacity on Grand and Clinton.”

However, as The Villager noted in their dispatch this week, navigation apps continue to list Clinton Street as the best artery to the Williamsburg Bridge.

DOT Presentation on Williamsburg Bridge Approach by BoweryBoogie on Scribd

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