Supreme Angers by Defacing Street Art with ‘Blessed’ Flyposting

Posted on: November 13th, 2018 at 5:07 am by

Call it supreme street drama.

Skatewear brand Supreme upset at least one street artist over the weekend by spreading its flyer campaign across every surface of the Lower East Side. Among others, the handbills, which advertise the new “Blessed” skate video, were wheat-pasted along the facade of 26 First Avenue. The landlord had reportedly commissioned art by Sacsix to appear on the ground-level outside Spiegel (it’s a way of promoting the business).

The ads throughout the neighborhood were enough to cause swift backlash against Supreme, as evidenced by the brief appearance of the “art not ads” graffiti slapped to its Lafayette Street headquarters yesterday.

“There’s no respect for disrespect” says Spiegel owner Shmuel Avital. “We are a place which prides ourselves in being part of the community. For a New York brand like Supreme to pay flyposters to cover the neighborhood with their illegal adverts shows a lack of respect for the city where they are based and for the artwork of real creatives, who do it for passion not money.”

Avital contacted Supreme after the incident, asking why the walls should be used to promote their products and whether the company will repair the damage. He apparently did not receive a reply.

“I don’t have a problem with illegal, corporate advertising posters,” Sacsix told us via text. “I used to work in advertising. My issue is when the corporate posters are blatantly placed over the work of artists.”

“However, a brand like Supreme should be true to themselves and support the street arts, not cover them.”

As previously reported, Supreme will take up temporary residence inside the historic Germania Bank Building on the Bowery in the coming months. It’s a brief relocation while the company remodels its current store.

Do street artists have an argument here, or is this part of the natural open-air evolution of public street walls?

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