Mount Sinai Details $140M Rivington House Transformation as ‘Largest’ Private Investment in Behavioral Health

Posted on: July 24th, 2019 at 5:00 am by

Mount Sinai this week released more details about its billion-dollar downtown plans, including the future of Rivington House.

The media advisory released on Monday boasts that the $140 million transformation is the “largest private investment in behavioral health in New York history.”

More below…

Included in the $1 billion Downtown plan is a $140 million commitment to create a comprehensive, community-oriented behavioral health center: The Mount Sinai Comprehensive Behavioral Health Center. The new facility, located at the site of the current Rivington House, will offer downtown residents a holistic approach to mental health and become a one-stop location for psychiatric, addiction, physical health, and social service needs. The new facility preserves all of the existing services at Mount Sinai Beth Israel and offers a host of new services, including intensive crisis and respite beds, partial hospitalization program, intensive outpatient program, mobile and in-home services, behavioral health care engagement teams, and primary care services. The site will not include methadone treatment services.

“The model of care for the Mount Sinai Behavioral Health Comprehensive Center will not be available anywhere else in New York. This Center exemplifies Mount Sinai’s deep and longstanding commitment to behavioral health, and it is not simply a re-location or addition of services. It is a new, transformational model of care for people with behavioral health conditions that creates a fully integrated continuum of care in one location,” said Sabina Lim, MD, MPH, Vice President and Chief of Strategy, Behavioral Health, for the Mount Sinai Health System.

Mount Sinai signed a 30-year lease for 130,000 square-feet in the building last year without much notice to the surrounding community. This didn’t sit well with area stakeholders at the time.

The Rivington House scandal began in early 2016 after the Allure Group paid the city $16.1 million to lift a restrictive deed, then flipped the property to developers Slate Property Group, China Vanke Co., and Adam America Real Estate for $116 million.

Originally built as a school in 1899, Rivington House was converted to a skilled nursing facility in the early 1990s, serving those living with HIV and AIDS. Upon its sale, 219 beds were lost.

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