Cuomo Signs New Law to Create State Liquor License Database

Posted on: October 8th, 2019 at 5:01 am by

Community Board 3 meeting, July 2017

Finally a ray of light for residents long plagued by bad operators with full liquor licenses. Last week, Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill sponsored by local New York State Senator Brad Hoylman and Assemblywoman Deborah Glick that requires the State Liquor Authority to create and maintain a public database of information specific to on-premises liquor licenses.

That means those agreed-upon stipulations baked into liquor licenses will be more easily accessible, allowing for greater transparency and to keep operators in check. For instance, method of operation, outdoor use, or hours of operation.

In a public statement, Hoylman noted:

You shouldn’t have to file a FOIL request just to find out whether a bar in your neighborhood has a liquor license that permits live music or an outside patio. What’s more, under these constraints, police precincts aren’t able to respond to neighborhood noise complaints—as they have no way to confirm whether an establishment is operating within the parameters of their license or not.

Making liquor license information available to the public is an easy fix to make our neighborhoods work better for all New Yorkers. I’m thankful to Governor Cuomo for signing this bill into law, and to my Democratic colleagues and co-sponsor Assemblymember Glick for making government transparency a priority this session.”

The DL at Ludlow and Delancey

Glick also heralded the bill’s passage.

“For too long, it has been nearly impossible for community members to get very basic information about State Liquor Authority licensees that operate in our neighborhood,” she noted in the joint statement. “Now that liquor license information will be easily obtainable, people can see for themselves if nearby establishments are being good neighbors and are operating within the constraints of their license.”

The same press release also includes Community Board 3 District Manager Susan Stetzer, whose jurisdiction includes some of the most over-saturated blocks in the city (and state).

“Having information available online would be a tremendous help,” Stetzer said. “We spend a lot of time working with community groups and with our local precincts to resolve issues that require information about a licensed business, particularly method of operation and outdoor use questions.”

There is no timetable just yet on when the database will be available.

Recent Stories

Gigs to See on the Downtown Music Circuit the Month of August

The downtown music scene is approaching pre-pandemic levels, thanks in large part to increased bookings at many bars, restaurants and nightclubs. August looks more promising than any schedule in the past 16 months. Here are some highlights of upcoming shows this month, along with photographs from a few of the more active venues in July. […]

The Double-Decker Dining Shed on East 4th Street that Almost Happened

The dining shed as we know it is moving on up. Literally. Outside the Izakaya NYC on East 4th Street, workers were spotted assembling a double-decker dining shed on Friday morning. Complete with stairs, second floor, and astroturf. With the mezzanine at eye level with the first-floor apartments. By the evening, word was out and […]

Nolita Sommelier Charged with Setting Fire to Downtown Dining Structures

Photo: Forsythia Fire Department brass last week announced charges against a celebrated sommelier for setting fire to downtown dining structures. Caleb Ganzer, sommelier and partner at wine bar La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels on Centre Street, was arrested and charged with two counts of felony for three instances of arson, including two at outdoor dining […]

Exit through the Ludlow Street Food Court

Exit through the food court. Indeed, the vacant Ludlow Street lot made famous by Banksy over a decade ago is now a mini food court. Under the radar, too. The first day of operations at 159 Ludlow was apparently Friday, including two food trucks, produce vendors, and picnic table seating. One of the vendors is […]

Stringer Punts on East Side Coastal Resilience Contract

For advocates of East River Park, a brief reprieve. City Comptroller, and former mayoral candidate Scott Stringer did not sign the $1.2 billion construction contract with IPC Resiliency Partners that would kickstart city funding for the East Side Coastal Resilience project. It apparently boils down to missing info and the review period having elapsed. “As […]