Cuomo Signs New Law to Create State Liquor License Database

Posted on: October 8th, 2019 at 5:01 am by

Community Board 3 meeting, July 2017

Finally a ray of light for residents long plagued by bad operators with full liquor licenses. Last week, Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill sponsored by local New York State Senator Brad Hoylman and Assemblywoman Deborah Glick that requires the State Liquor Authority to create and maintain a public database of information specific to on-premises liquor licenses.

That means those agreed-upon stipulations baked into liquor licenses will be more easily accessible, allowing for greater transparency and to keep operators in check. For instance, method of operation, outdoor use, or hours of operation.

In a public statement, Hoylman noted:

You shouldn’t have to file a FOIL request just to find out whether a bar in your neighborhood has a liquor license that permits live music or an outside patio. What’s more, under these constraints, police precincts aren’t able to respond to neighborhood noise complaints—as they have no way to confirm whether an establishment is operating within the parameters of their license or not.

Making liquor license information available to the public is an easy fix to make our neighborhoods work better for all New Yorkers. I’m thankful to Governor Cuomo for signing this bill into law, and to my Democratic colleagues and co-sponsor Assemblymember Glick for making government transparency a priority this session.”

The DL at Ludlow and Delancey

Glick also heralded the bill’s passage.

“For too long, it has been nearly impossible for community members to get very basic information about State Liquor Authority licensees that operate in our neighborhood,” she noted in the joint statement. “Now that liquor license information will be easily obtainable, people can see for themselves if nearby establishments are being good neighbors and are operating within the constraints of their license.”

The same press release also includes Community Board 3 District Manager Susan Stetzer, whose jurisdiction includes some of the most over-saturated blocks in the city (and state).

“Having information available online would be a tremendous help,” Stetzer said. “We spend a lot of time working with community groups and with our local precincts to resolve issues that require information about a licensed business, particularly method of operation and outdoor use questions.”

There is no timetable just yet on when the database will be available.

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