Family Alleges Negligence in Death of Worker at LES Synagogue Site

Posted on: October 29th, 2019 at 5:03 am by

The law firm representing the construction worker killed in the Lower East Side synagogue collapse last week outlined more details of what happened.

According to a press release by the Platta Law Firm, it appears the legal investigation centers on a negligence claim. Apparently the two victims, including the deceased – Ridgewood resident Stanislaw Supinski – were performing asbestos abatement near the destabilized south tower of the Beth Hamedrash Hagadol remnants. At the same time, contractors were allegedly performing excavation work with a backhoe.

“This excavation work caused the unsecured wall to collapse onto these two workers and caused Mr. Supinski’s untimely death,” the firm notes. “These two workers should not have been permitted to perform this asbestos abatement work while excavation work was being performed nearby.”

Below is more from the mailer:

Our office is in the process of conducting a thorough investigation of this accident. Preliminary reports indicate that Mr. Supinski and the other worker injured in this accident were performing asbestos abatement on excavated debris near an unsecured wall of a previously burned and structurally unsound synagogue while an excavator was being operated nearby. This excavation work caused the unsecured wall to collapse onto these two workers and caused Mr. Supinski’s untimely death. These two workers should not have been permitted to perform this asbestos abatement work while excavation work was being performed nearby. It appears that the negligence of the owner and general contractor directly caused this accident and Mr. Supinski’s tragic death.

The Beth Hamedrash Hagadol structure on Norfolk Street dated back to 1850, when it was erected as a Baptist church. The Jewish congregation took over three decades later. It became one of the first city landmarks, receiving designation in 1967. It fell into dormancy and disrepair over the last decade. Then, in May 2018, a teenage arsonist torched the place. But for reasons unclear, was released from custody and not charged by NYPD.

The site itself will be redeveloped into two-towered residential building.

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