This is What Happens When Harvey Weinstein Shows his Face at a Bar on Avenue B

Posted on: October 25th, 2019 at 5:07 am by

Photo: Zoe Stuckless

Disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein spent Wednesday night at an Alphabet City bar where he was confronted by women during a private event. The protesters, including a comedian, were booed.

The evening was captured on social media.

At an event called “Actors Hour” at Downtime on Avenue B, comedian Kelly Bachman addressed the “elephant in the room,” referencing Weinstein, who’s been accused (and charged) with sexually abusing dozens of women. He reportedly sat with several women and a bodyguard.

“I didn’t know that we had to bring our own mace and rape whistles to Actors Hour,” Bachman said during her set.

Photo: Zoe Stuckless/Facebook

Another female patron in attendance, Zoe Stuckless, confronted Weinstein and was subsequently escorted from the premises. She detailed her experience in a lengthy post to Facebook:

Tonight was one of the most surreal nights of my life.

I went to an event called Actors Hour, whose mission statement is to empower emerging artists and to “create an open space for creatives to share what they love.” After a while, a friend of mine pointed out a man sitting in a booth.

It was Harvey Weinstein, surrounded by a cadre of young women and two bodyguards. He wasn’t hiding. He came to watch young artists be vulnerable on stage.

The show started, and no one said anything. At first I didn’t think it was him. There was no way. But then a comic got on stage and called out to the crowd to address “the elephant in the room.” As soon as she alluded to his presence in the room the event organizers, the bartenders, and a number of others booed her into silence. She continued her set, stunned into compliance.

I was sitting there, and the more that I sat there waiting for the event organizers to kick him out, or for another performer to call him out, or for the audience to revolt, the more I found myself paralyzed by the silence. He was sitting there, allowed to laugh and clap and drink and flirt and no one was saying anything. The more I sat there the more furious I was at all of our inaction.

I thought about all of the voices that have been silenced over so many years. I thought about the artists, the women, who were paralyzed by the same fear that I felt, surrounded by colleagues who were intimidated into a culture of silence and passivity. This room was a microcosm of our whole community. And I couldn’t sit there and let him laugh. So I spoke up.

I was kicked out of the bar tonight. His bodyguards herded me out. The event organizers were happy to see me go.

In some ways tonight was a horrible, painful reminder of the power a man like Weinstein holds even now. It was a reminder that even in this time of relative awareness it is hypnotically easy to be pulled into a culture of silence.

However, it was also a reminder that our voices have so much more power when we stand together.
When I left the building, crying out of fury and frustration I was quickly surrounded by a group of mostly women who expressed the same fear to raise their voice that I had. They thanked me for speaking up.

Our passivity is poison. We need to stand together, and we need to speak up. Or this poison will fester, only encouraged by our fear.

Recent Stories

Group Viciously Assaults Man on Allen Street, then Steals his Pants

Police say a man was assaulted, slashed, and robbed by a group of people in broad daylight at Allen Canal Streets Friday morning. According to the police report, at 11:30am, a pack of twelve individuals – both male and female – jumped the 26-year-old victim in the center median (aka Allen Street Mall). Surveillance footage […]

In Chinatown, it’s Elders Lost in Vaccination

As the nation’s coronavirus death toll exceeds 400,000, news of mass vaccination sites opening across New York city is certainly welcome. However, securing an appointment is proving a daunting task. The mayor previously stressed equity in treatment for vaccination, which is rolled out in phases. Yet, with the mandate that all appointments require online registration, […]

State Suspends Dudley’s Liquor License Over Sidewalk Dining Enclosures

The State Liquor Authority wielded its hammer last weekend, summarily suspending the liquor license of Dudley’s on Orchard Street. At issue was the sprawling street eatery constructed by the business, which wraps the corner of Broome Street. Inspectors paid a visit on January 15, and witnessed forty-five patrons “dining within inside enclosures located on the […]

Clayton’s Corner: Overthrow the Wrong Way

In this installment of Clayton’s Corner, photographer Clayton Patterson shares news that the Overthrow boxing gym on Bleecker Street is back in action. Then, crosstown on Essex Street, two cops stopped for a quick slice. However, flouting traffic by driving the wrong way to park in front of Champion Pizza. This move seemed to irk […]

How COVID and a Bus Stop Chased Benson’s from Essex Street

The following guest post was penned by Boogie reader Sydney Fishman. For five years, Benson’s held down the corner of East Houston and Essex Streets with craft beers, sumptuous burgers, and the occasional movie night. The movie nights, according to owner Annie Morton, were the highlight of Benson’s tenure on the Lower East Side. Before […]