Racial Justice and Remembering Black history on the Bowery

Posted on: June 12th, 2020 at 5:01 am by

“The Bowery at Night,” by Louis W. Sonntag, 1895; Museum of the City of NY

The following guest piece was written by David Mulkins from the Bowery Alliance of Neighbors.

African Americans have endured hundreds of years of slavery; another 100 post-Civil War years of segregation, Jim Crow laws and terror; and in the last 50 years since the Civil Rights era, varying degrees of de facto segregation, exclusion, and systematic bias and racism by the police and other institutions in the north as well as the south.

Here in liberal New York City, slavery did indeed once exist, and even when it was abolished in New York State, the City’s financial ties to slave traders and southern cotton plantations made it very divided on the issue, as evidenced by the bloody Draft Riots of 1863, which saw vicious attacks on Blacks, their homes and their businesses.

Our recent explorations of Bowery history have highlighted both positive and negative moments of African American history. On the positive end, we are proud to know that Manhattan’s first free Black settlements were on the Bowery, that 134 and 136 Bowery were active centers of Abolitionist work, that anti-slavery fighter John Brown’s body was prepared for burial at 163 Bowery, and that Lincoln made his epochal anti-slavery speech at Cooper Union.  In 1854, a hundred years before Rosa Parks, on what was once the lower stretch of the Bowery, Elizabeth Jennings, a hardworking African American teacher and church organist, was beaten and thrown off a segregated streetcar. Her victorious legal challenge led to the desegregation of the city’s public transit system.

Poster from “Windows on the Bowery

The legendary William Henry “Master Juba” Lane, the African American “father of tap dance” hit the big time when he appeared at the 3,000-seat Bowery Theatre.  But that same theater also gave a career boost to the White performer T.D. Rice, whose “Jump Jim Crow” act – which mimicked Black singing, dancing and joke-telling tradition – helped codify stereotypes of Blacks, led to the institution of minstrelsy, and inadvertently became the post-Civil War namesake for the Jim Crow laws that segregated and oppressed African Americans for over a hundred years.

The Bowery Alliance of Neighbors stands in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, the nonviolent protests over the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, and the efforts to end systemic racism and bias against African Americans and other minorities, both in police departments and other institutions entrusted to serve all the American people. We also abhor and condemn the violence and destruction carried out in our city by looters, fringe elements, and agents provocateurs, all of whom discredit a just cause and bring additional trauma to a city already devastated by the sickness, death, mass unemployment and financial ruin brought by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Seeing police officers taking a knee with protesters is a welcome, moving gesture on the individual level that we hope will be followed up by transformative gestures from within the police departments themselves. The current massive uprising of protest and heated dialogue on race and police bias is extraordinary and will hopefully lead to continued soul searching, truth-telling, and most importantly, major institutional change in both police departments and other institutions that impact and matter to the lives of Blacks, other minorities and all Americans.

Recent Stories

Stanton Street 99-Cent Pizzeria Robbed Before Thanksgiving

Another commercial robbery in Hell Square. Last week, just before Thanksgiving, the 99-cent pizzeria at 105 Stanton Street fell victim. Police say that two men busted through the front door and stole money from the cash register ($1,400) as well as an electronic bicycle (valued at $2,400). Both individuals were seen fleeing eastbound on Stanton Street […]

Running for Chinatown Amidst a Pandemic (Again)

For the second time since spring, one Chinatown native is literally stepping up to help the community. Leland Yu, the 28-year-old member of the Chinese Freemasons Athletic Club, returns to the pavement this Saturday for his 12-hour “Run for Chinatown.” The last time around, he clocked an astonishing 61.2 miles, and raised over $18,000. Yu […]

Marriott’s Moxy Hotel on the Bowery Begins 18-Story Ascent

The first elements of the new Moxy hotel on the Bowery are now visible. Peeking above the tattered boards at Bowery is a network of structural steel beams. Department of Buildings signage onsite promises a rather optimistic completion date of “spring 2022.” Given progress thus far, though, meeting the goal seems unrealistic. As reported, the […]

When ‘Forward’ Lit the Way on East Broadway

There was a time when the lights burned bright above East Broadway. And we’re not talking about the sign for 169 Bar. Indeed, the iconic Jewish Daily Forward building at 175 East Broadway – designated a city landmark in 1983 – once boasted rooftop lighting that may have rivaled those of the Atlantic City boardwalk. […]

Dough Pizza Takes Over from ‘Champion’ at Ludlow Residence Dorm

Pizza maven, Famous Hakki Akdeniz recently shut down his Champion Pizza outpost on Ludlow Street. Now, a likeminded successor is ready to swoop in. Dough Pizza, a new pizza business, just signed a lease for the 475 square-foot spot in the base of the School of Visual Arts skyscraper dormitory (aka Ludlow Residence). The restaurant […]