LES Partnership Again Encroaches on CB3 Liquor Committee

Posted on: June 17th, 2020 at 5:07 am by

A fight at Hair of the Dog, April 2018

For the second time in as many years, the question is posed, though the conditions on the ground are vastly different. Should local business improvement districts possess administrative input in the liquor license process?

The Lower East Side Partnership briefly appeared on the Community Board 3 docket this month regarding a proposal to assist in “OP license administrative approvals.” Or, in layman’s terms – insert and influence decision-making over area liquor licenses.

Keep in mind that the dominant purpose of a BID is catering to its neighborhood stakeholders (e.g. wealthy property owners, special interests, large businesses). So, this power play makes sense.

The Lower East Side Partnership

You’ll recall that, nearly two years ago, the Partnership pitched Community Board 3 on a three-part plan at the hyperlocal level – help vet new liquor licensees, assist with the application submission paperwork, and police license stipulations (technically the responsibility of NYPD and SLA).

As before, the strategy is endorsed by CB3 Chair Alysha Coleman and District Manager Susan Stetzer. Both were strongly in favor, having suggested that this arrangement could relieve and “streamline” the overburdened SLA subcommittee, which oftentimes works late into the night reviewing applications.

The SLA subcommittee was set to hear the proposition tonight, but the item was quietly scratched.

Meanwhile, locals maintain that the public is being subverted and without a say in this proposed arrangement. And that it goes hand-in-hand with the BID’s attempt to expand its boundaries (and revenue stream) to the East Village and Chinatown, as the current proposal encompasses the entire CB3 territory.

The Lower East Side Dwellers block association remains at the forefront of this fight.

As for the Lower East Side Partnership, the nonprofit was founded in 1991 by local real estate baron Sion Misrahi to attract business to the neighborhood with the “bargain district” slogan. What ensued was decades of courting nightlife, and a persistent invasion of umpteen bars, hotels, and restaurants in a tiny nine-square-block radius. Enough to cause legitimate public heath concerns in the present day.

Recent Stories

Clayton’s Corner: Martha Cooper to Middle Collegiate

Clayton Patterson sent his latest dispatch of imagery from his recent neighborhood walkabouts. The latest Clayton’s Corner is here. Legendary graffiti photographer, Martha Cooper, standing beside a payphone in Astor Place that features one of her iconic images. NY PopsUp spent last weekend at the International Center of Photography on Essex Street. It drew crowds […]

Upside Pizza Slinging Slices in Little Italy

Upside Pizza is now serving at the former home of Pomodoro in Little Italy. It opened on Spring Street this past Wednesday. Founder Noam Grossman and partners Eli and Oren Halali (behind 2 Brothers and Taqueria Diana) had been renovating 51 Spring Street since the fall. The pizza parlor opted for a gut renovation, resulting […]

Jing Fong Workers Protest Dining Room Closure and Rumored Shutdown

Despite the brisk weather, several dozen union members and Jing Fong employees rallied Tuesday morning in front of the East West Bank on Centre Street to save save the iconic dim sum restaurant. Advocates called on the Chu family, which owns the Elizabeth Street property (and the aforementioned bank), to stop killing Chinatown and to keep […]

Forever Stalled Delancey Street Condo Tower is Finally Rising

Stop the press – there is actual real world progress to report on a long-stalled development at the east end of Delancey Street. The 12-story “boutique condo” at the corner of Delancey and Pitt Streets has seen some serious progress in recent months, after spending most of its life cycle as a stalled steel skeleton. […]

Asian Man Pummeled Outside East Broadway Station in Latest Biased Attack

An Asian man was assaulted in an unprovoked attack outside the East Broadway subway station Tuesday night, adding to a recent spate of biased assaults against Asians across the city. Cops said the 56-year-old victim was entering the F train station – the Rutgers Street entrance by Woo’s Wonton King – at about 8:50pm when […]