Appeals Court Reverses Decision Blocking Two Bridges Towers

Posted on: August 28th, 2020 at 5:00 am by

The future coastline, Photo: SHoP Architects

In a major upset, the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court yesterday sided with a gaggle of developers in the long-running dispute over four skyscrapers on the Lower East Side waterfront.

The verdict reversed the lower court ruling that had essentially blocked the wall of glass from happening.

State Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron last August had ruled in favor of New York City Council and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer in their lawsuit against the city, which contended that the three proposed mega-developments were required to go through the public review process (ULURP). At the heart of the action was the de Blasio administration’s 2016 classification of the residential spires – all exceeding eighty stories – as a “minor modification” to the existing large scale residential development, and therefore not subject to ULURP.

The Appellate decision was a unanimous 4-0.

However, this decision does not affect the simultaneous lawsuit brought by Lower East Side community coalition, and for whom Judge Engoron had also sided. Given the ruling here, though, that verdict could be overturned.

As previously reported, JDS and Two Bridges Neighborhood Council will erect a 1,008-foot rental building that cantilevers over a senior center, designed by SHoP Architects (247 Cherry Street); L+M and CIM proposed a 798 and 728-foot tower beast in the parking lot behind Lands End II, designed by Handel Architects (260 South Street); and Starrett planned a 724-foot tower, designed by Perkins Eastman (259 Clinton Street).

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