History

Celebrating Rosh Hashanah in the 1900s Lower East Side [PHOTOS]

Posted September 18, 2020 at 5:09 am

Sundown tonight marks the beginning of the Jewish new year with the holiday of Rosh Hashanah. To celebrate, below is a small collection of photos, courtesy of the Library of Congress, illustrating how Jews of the early 1900s celebrated the holiest of days while living in the ghetto of the Lower East Side. You’ll notice […]

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Tenement Museum Relaunches Walking Tours, but Indoor Programs Still on Hold

Posted September 2, 2020 at 5:04 am

While larger museums and cultural institutions around the city are reopening after a pandemic-induced sidelining, here on the Lower East Side, the Tenement Museum will remain dark. No indoor programming at 97 Orchard Street for the foreseeable future. Historically appropriate, in a sense. Tenements were harbingers of disease throughout the generations due to overcrowding small […]

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Uncapped: Rest in Peace Gerald “Jerry” Wolkoff of 5POINTZ Fame

Last modified August 18, 2020 at 3:46 pm

Hello Uncapped Brethren. Some of you may find this news a little late and not worth your time, but it came to my attention, that Gerald “Jerry” Wolkoff passed away. He was 83 and had a neurological disorder unbeknownst to him. Death came quickly for the Brooklyn-born real estate Titan, and news of his passing […]

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Fate of Samuel Cox Statue in Tompkins Square Park Remains Uncertain

Posted August 18, 2020 at 5:05 am

The statue of Samuel Cox residing in Tompkins Square Park is on the proverbial chopping block. 2nd District Councilwoman Carlina Rivera is calling for Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver to remove the 19th century figurehead from the public eye. “Historians and numerous New Yorkers have highlighted that Cox’s history – beyond his work regarding pro-labor policies […]

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Streets

With Statues Toppling, is there a Double Standard over the Lower East Side Lenin?

Last modified July 29, 2020 at 11:26 am

As statues are deposed and defaced around the country, one Lower East Side fixture still stands tall – Vladimir Lenin. He oversees the downtown environs from his perch atop 178 Norfolk Street, arm outstretched towards the hallmark of American capitalism: Wall Street. This begs a question – how can an icon for a dictator who […]

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Threatened East River Park Buildings Recognized for Architectural Distinction

Posted July 16, 2020 at 5:05 am

The following guest post was written by Deborah Wye, a member of the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative board of directors. Two East River Park Art Deco gems were recently deemed eligible for the State and National Registers of Historic Places by the New York State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). Both the Track House near […]

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Revisiting the Rise of Brooks Brothers on the Lower East Side

Posted July 15, 2020 at 5:08 am

Last week, Brooks Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, citing the coronavirus shutdown and fashion trends toward casual. Two firms are vying to acquire the 202-year-old formal wear company and inject new capital. Ergo, the time seemed appropriate to revisit the store’s connection to the Lower East Side. Brooks Brothers was actually founded near […]

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Decades on, Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center Moves from Allen Street

Posted June 15, 2020 at 5:09 am

After two decades of community service on Allen Street, the Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center is on the move. The community-based, non-profit organization closed its low-profile facility at 25 Allen last month. It will reopen at 35 East Broadway beginning in August. The Alliance for Positive Change, which has run the program since 2016, […]

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Streets

Racial Justice and Remembering Black history on the Bowery

Last modified June 12, 2020 at 7:42 pm

The following guest piece was written by David Mulkins from the Bowery Alliance of Neighbors. African Americans have endured hundreds of years of slavery; another 100 post-Civil War years of segregation, Jim Crow laws and terror; and in the last 50 years since the Civil Rights era, varying degrees of de facto segregation, exclusion, and […]

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Streets

How the Museum at Eldridge Street is Faring in the Time of COVID-19

Last modified May 19, 2020 at 3:00 pm

Amid nationwide closures, the Museum at Eldridge Street (aka the Eldridge Street Synagogue) is swinging its focus, by expanding its offerings to a global audience through virtual programming. The historic museum representing Jewish New York has, like so many others, been closed to foot traffic since stay-at-home orders were first mandated. One of the main […]

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