History

Revisiting the Rise of Brooks Brothers on the Lower East Side

Posted July 15, 2020 at 5:08 am

Last week, Brooks Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, citing the coronavirus shutdown and fashion trends toward casual. Two firms are vying to acquire the 202-year-old formal wear company and inject new capital. Ergo, the time seemed appropriate to revisit the store’s connection to the Lower East Side. Brooks Brothers was actually founded near […]

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Decades on, Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center Moves from Allen Street

Posted June 15, 2020 at 5:09 am

After two decades of community service on Allen Street, the Lower East Side Harm Reduction Center is on the move. The community-based, non-profit organization closed its low-profile facility at 25 Allen last month. It will reopen at 35 East Broadway beginning in August. The Alliance for Positive Change, which has run the program since 2016, […]

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Streets

Racial Justice and Remembering Black history on the Bowery

Last modified June 12, 2020 at 7:42 pm

The following guest piece was written by David Mulkins from the Bowery Alliance of Neighbors. African Americans have endured hundreds of years of slavery; another 100 post-Civil War years of segregation, Jim Crow laws and terror; and in the last 50 years since the Civil Rights era, varying degrees of de facto segregation, exclusion, and […]

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Streets

How the Museum at Eldridge Street is Faring in the Time of COVID-19

Last modified May 19, 2020 at 3:00 pm

Amid nationwide closures, the Museum at Eldridge Street (aka the Eldridge Street Synagogue) is swinging its focus, by expanding its offerings to a global audience through virtual programming. The historic museum representing Jewish New York has, like so many others, been closed to foot traffic since stay-at-home orders were first mandated. One of the main […]

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RECAP: Tom & Lorenzo Discuss Legendary Children at Housing Works Bookstore

Last modified May 6, 2020 at 11:57 pm

Social distancing is not what New Yorkers generally practice, and many of us are becoming starved for social interaction. So, we decided to run a non-covid story about an event which happened in early March, right before we all went on lockdown. You know, some escapism. The term “Legendary Children,” part of the title of […]

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‘Bill Graham and the Rock & Roll Revolution’ Opens at the New-York Historical Society

Last modified February 21, 2020 at 7:36 am

For many who grew up in a certain era, the name Bill Graham sparks Proustian memories of life-changing rock-and-roll shows. And if you were in San Francisco or New York City, the music impresario’s Fillmore concert venues were the greatest places in the world to see live music. Starting in 1965, Graham was booking and […]

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Hundreds of Chinatown Museum Archive Boxes Recovered from Mulberry Street Fire Site

Posted January 30, 2020 at 5:04 am

Recovery efforts began yesterday for the archives of the Museum of Chinese in America many feared destroyed in the five-alarm fire on Mulberry Street last week. We are told that Department of Citywide Administrative Services contractors rescued approximately one hundred boxes of archival material from 70 Mulberry Street, and that hundreds more remain (in unknown […]

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Exhuming the Signage of the Long Lost ‘Garden Cafeteria’ on East Broadway

Posted July 26, 2019 at 5:00 am

The following guest post was written by Chelsea Dowell, director of public engagement at the Museum at Eldridge Street. Visitors to the Museum at Eldridge Street will be treated to an extra dose of neighborhood nostalgia, now that a massive sign from the beloved Garden Cafeteria has been installed on its walls. The East Broadway […]

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In Lamenting the Loss of MAD Magazine, Exhuming its Lafayette Street Origins [HISTORY]

Posted July 9, 2019 at 5:07 am

Last week, over the quiet Fourth of July holiday, the world learned that MAD Magazine will no longer appear on newsstands, and cease to print new material. Instead, the iconic 67-year-old satire will go into syndication, so to speak. According to widely published reports, the October issue will be the last. Thereafter, mainly reruns – the […]

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The Oft-Overlooked ‘Drag Balls’ of Harlem [HISTORY]

Posted June 28, 2019 at 5:08 am

Bet that got your attention. The year was 1931 and “Fag Ball” was the newspaper equivalent click-bait of the decade. Certainly made me wonder what all the fuss was about, and how it all began. And by “it,” I mean Drag Balls.  Don’t let your Mothers down, children. We must leave the Lower. In 1869, […]

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