History

Henry Street Settlement Receives $360K Grant from National Endowment for the Humanities

Posted April 20, 2017 at 9:28 am

The Henry Street Settlement recently won a substantial grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Indeed, $360,000 –  the largest non-media grant awarded – has been earmarked to support the settlement’s latest venture, “The House on Henry Street: Settlements, Public Health and Social Reform.” It’s multi-platform exhibition that will “explore social activism, urban poverty and public health […]

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Did You Know that NYC has its Own Naval Militia? [HISTORY]

Posted February 24, 2017 at 9:49 am

Ever heard of the New York Naval Militia? I hadn’t, but now that I have, why not share? From their website: The New York Naval Militia was organized as a Provisional Naval Battalion in 1889 and was formally mustered into State service as the First Battalion, Naval Reserve Artillery, on 23 June 1891. Today, the New […]

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Take a Walk Through the Abandoned Bowery Subway Station [VIDEO]

Posted January 26, 2017 at 5:14 am

If you’re planning a visit to the abandoned Bowery subway station, which I am not encouraging, make sure to bring bail money and are ready to run. The city’s Vandal Squad has eyes on this NYC gem 24/7. As an alternative, check out the video below, shot in 2015 by YouTuber Urban NYC. It’s definitely […]

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Preservation and Celebration with the ‘Lower East Side Oral History Project’

Posted January 19, 2017 at 9:48 am

The New York Public Library’s Lower East Side Oral History Project is officially up and running. And ready to celebrate. The recently-launched neighborhood history project aims to document and preserve LES history through the eyes of its inhabitants. The locals. You know, not the droves who hole up in Hell Square on the weekends. Community volunteers have been trained to […]

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How One Lower East Sider Forever Changed Chanukah with ‘I Have a Little Dreidel’

Last modified December 29, 2016 at 8:36 am

Each year, when gathering for the Jewish Festival of Lights, candles are lit, latkes (and chocolate gelt) eaten, and traditional songs sung. One such number never fades. And we’re not talking about Adam Sandler’s comedic Chanukah rhyme, either. Rather, “I Have a Little Dreidel,” a folk ditty that was born on the Lower East Side […]

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Trump’s Grandfather Lived at this Lower East Side Tenement in 1885 [HISTORY]

Posted December 16, 2016 at 5:09 am

The first Trump Palace was a fairly ordinary tenement on the Lower East Side. One that now overlooks Sara D. Roosevelt Park. Donald Trump’s grandfather Friedrich arrived in the United States on October 19, 1885. It was on a steamer called the S.S. Eider. At 16, a barber’s apprentice, he left Germany without performing the mandatory […]

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When Brazen Burglers Stole a 4,000-Pound Safe from a Canal Street Jewelery Shop in Broad Daylight [HISTORY]

Posted December 15, 2016 at 9:32 am

For one Chinatown address, a century of jewelry history is gone. Since as early as 1915, the six-story corner building at 105 Canal Street hosted jewelry stores and diamond dealers on premise almost exclusively. That changed in the spring of 2012 when Crawford Fine Gold Jewelry packed up and relocated to the Bowery. Two failed […]

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What it Was Like Growing Up in the Notorious McGurk’s Suicide Hall on the Bowery [HISTORY]

Last modified October 18, 2016 at 4:32 pm

Here’s a story of a building nicknamed McGurk’s Suicide Hall. You may have read it before. We touched upon the history a while back, but for this go ’round we decided to dig deeper into the past, while chatting with someone who actually lived there: Mr. Mehai Bakaty of forty-year-old pioneer, Fineline Tattoo. 295 Bowery was built in […]

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Sammy Fuchs and Friends: Revisiting the Legendary Sammy’s Bowery Follies [HISTORY]

Last modified September 21, 2016 at 11:48 am

When we last came together around history, our subject was Weegee; it is therefore apropos that we focus on one of his closest friends. A famous man throughout the old Bouwerie. A man whom, without Weegee, would not have had his establishment documented so thoroughly. A man named Sammy Fuchs, the proprietor of Sammy’s Bowery Follies. Sammy Fuchs […]

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Tenement Museum Prepares for Contemporary Immigrant Exhibit, yet Remains Opposed to LES Historic District

Posted August 19, 2016 at 9:35 am

The Tenement Museum is high on recent coverage of its forthcoming exhibit. One that speaks to a more contemporary history of the block. Starting next summer, the upper floors of 103 Orchard Street (aka 81 Delancey) will offer a glimpse of more modern life at this corner of the Lower East Side (i.e. “Your Story, […]

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